Pages

Thursday, June 19, 2014

5 Weird (But Effective) Ways You Can Conquer Chronic Procrastination

5 Weird (But Effective) Ways You Can Conquer Chronic Procrastination


5 Weird (But Effective) Ways You Can Conquer Chronic Procrastination

Posted: 19 Jun 2014 11:26 AM PDT

I've posted a fair amount of research related to procrastination in the past, let's round it up so we have a useful list to refer to when willpower gets low.

1) "Positive" Procrastination

Yes, that's right, procrastination can be a good thing.

Dr. John Perry, author of The Art of Procrastination, explains a good method for leveraging your laziness:

The key to productivity, he argues in "The Art of Procrastination," is to make more commitments — but to be methodical about it.

At the top of your to-do list, put a couple of daunting, if not impossible, tasks that are vaguely important-sounding (but really aren't) and seem to have deadlines (but really don't). Then, farther down the list, include some doable tasks that really matter.

"Doing these tasks becomes a way of not doing the things higher up on the list," Dr. Perry writes.

A similar tip is described by Piers Steel, author of The Procrastination Equation:

"My best trick is to play my projects off against each other, procrastinating on one by working on another."

Dr. Steel says it's based on sound principles of behavioral psychology:

"We are willing to pursue any vile task as long as it allows us to avoid something worse."

2) Dashes

A big part of chronic procrastination is dread. The task seems overwhelming. And that's the first issue that needs attacking: those feelings.

By breaking the problem down into smaller chunks — even ones that require only 1 minute of activity — you prove to yourself the task isn't insurmountable:

…a dash, which is simply a short burst of focused activity during which you force yourself to do nothing but work on the procrastinated item for a very short period of time—perhaps as little as just one minute.

So this sounds good in theory but you're probably thinking: what's that first step and won't that be horribly, horribly painful?

For any procrastinated task, the first thing is to take one minute and just write down the steps you need to do to finish the task:

Just a rough draft, at first, and that's it. Maybe just 3 steps. I then add more steps… Now, for some unknown reason, when there is nothing else to think about, and there is no way to screw this task up, because everything is laid out in front of me, I just start working on the task automatically. I might do just the first baby micro-step at first, but that's OK. It follows to the next, and to the next, and before I know it, the task is finished.

3) Commitment Devices

You know that rewards and punishments can be effective in building good behavior.

This theory can still be the backbone of a very effective strategy — once you take that pesky "you" out of the equation.

Give your friend $100. If you get the task done by 5PM, you get your $100 back. If it doesn't, you lose the $100.

Or make it $200 that the friend doesn't keep — they donate it to the KKK or NAMBLA in your name.

Get the picture? That's a commitment device.

The most important thing is the default position. You can't say "I will give them $200 if I fail." No, you give the $200 first.

The default is: they have your money. You want it back? Get the task done on time.

4) Improve your mood

You procrastinate the most when you're in a bad mood and think you can improve it with something fun.

When you're in a good mood or when you don't think you can improve how you feel, you screw around a lot less.

Via Temptation: Finding Self-Control in an Age of Excess:

So procrastination is a mood-management technique, albeit (like eating or taking drugs) a shortsighted one. But we're most prone to it when we think it will actually help… Well, far and away the most procrastination occurred among the bad-mood students who believed their mood could be changed and who had access to fun distractions. This group spent nearly 14 of their 15 minutes of prep time goofing off! Students who believed their bad mood was frozen (those who were not given a supposedly mood-lifting candle) spent less than 6 minutes goofing off. (Even the good-mood students procrastinated slightly more if they believed their mood could be altered.)

If you're really going to be motivated, you need to feel something. Having a rational goal in mind or thinking you want something just isn't enough.

What moves you? What inspires you? Try that. Don't know what makes you feel better? Go here.

Because glib as it may sound, changing your mood can change your mind.

5) The Combo

So here's the chronic procrastination knockout punch:

1) Manage your mood throughout the day. Do the little things that keep you positive. Get enough sleep. Eat regularly. Take breaks.

2) Make your list of to-do's with the terrifying stuff at the top and the easier stuff at the bottom.

3) Do a one minute dash and write out the steps needed to beat the first problem. This should help you get past the fear and start building momentum. If the dashes aren't working, they're not short and easy enough.

4) Still too difficult? Use positive procrastination and do one of the things lower on this list, rather than #1.

5) Establish your commitment device. Hand your friend that money, your most cherished possession or whatever has the most painful downside you can think of. The default position must be that you're already screwed and need to un-screw yourself. If the commitment devices aren't working, they're not scary enough.

After that, just loop 3-5.

With enough practice, these become habit and that's the goal.

The desire to procrastinate never completely vanishes. What matters is how you respond when you get that itch.

This piece originally appeared on Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

Prince George Gets a Really Fancy Birthday Present

Posted: 19 Jun 2014 11:22 AM PDT

What do you get the one-year-old who has everything? His own currency, of course.

The Royal Mint announced it is creating a limited-edition £5 silver coin in honor of Prince George’s first birthday on July 22. It’s the “nation’s gift” to the Royal Baby.

Queen Elizabeth II’s face will be on the coin, as with all currency in the United Kingdom. But it will also be the first coin to include the cruciform version of the royal arms, representing England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, since 1960. There will only be 7,500 coins available, with a limit of 10 coins per household.

Each coin will be sold for £80, or about $136. The coin was approved by the child’s parents, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (that’s William and Kate to you commoners), along with his great grandmother, Queen Elizabeth.

Life in Mosul Gets Back to Normal, Even With ISIS in Control

Posted: 19 Jun 2014 11:13 AM PDT

Two weeks ago, Governor Atheel Nujeifi oversaw the city of Mosul and its surrounding province of 3.8 million people. Today, he's holding meetings on the eighteenth floor of a luxury hotel in Erbil, some 50 miles away from Mosul.

His security detail sits at the end of the hall, his eyes locked on Nujeifi's door, and a handgun tucked under his shirt.

"They have made maybe ten attempts on my life," said Nujeifi, who left Mosul with his entourage of 20 armed guards when militants under the flag of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) took the city on June 10.

The group now controls swathes of Syrian and Iraqi territory including two major Iraqi cities, Mosul and Tikrit, and have launched an offensive to take over the country's largest oil refinery. Initially, hundreds of thousands of people fled Mosul, but within days many residents returned to the city to live under the rule of a group so radical even Al-Qaeda distanced itself from the fighters. And to many, it’s a distinct improvement.

"Do you know how it was in Mosul before ISIS came? We had bombings and assassinations almost everyday. Now we have security," said Abu Sadr, who asked to be identified by a nickname, from his home in Mosul's Hay Al Sukar neigbourhood. "I'm going to work, going to the market, like normal, and people are coming back to the city."

According to Abu Sadr it is basically life as usual in Mosul. There is little of the tyrannical Islamic Sharia enforcement the group's name has become synonymous with. Abu Sadr has seen Pakistani, Afghani and Syrian fighters amid the Iraqi ISIS recruits, but says the fighters have yet to adorn the city with their signature black flag. They fly them only above their checkpoints, which some residents say are fewer than the army had there, two weeks ago.

"The streets are a bit quiet, some people are staying inside," he said.

That doesn’t mean things are easy under ISIS control. The internet has been cut and residents complain of limited fuel and water, and 22 hours per day without electricity, while temperatures hit above 110 °F. "Since June 10, no fuel has come into Mosul," Nujeifi, the city’s governor, says. Lines are now forming outside petrol stations in the adjacent Kurdish territory, as Mosul residents come to buy fuel and return.

ISIS has tried to nominate a new governor from among the ranks of old Baathist officers, but no one was willing, according to Nujeifi. "They all refused because they know there is no future with ISIS," he said. "They are not able to run the city by themselves."

But for many in Mosul who despised the rule of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's Shi'ite-led government from Baghdad, a lack of services is not the most important thing. "We don't have water or power but we have security," said Omar, who came to Erbil from his native Mosul on Tuesday, a week after ISIS took the city. The streets of Mosul are calm, he said, and he only left for his job as a chef at this hotel in Kurdish Erbil. "They are not making any problems with the local people. ISIS only came for the army."

The army didn't stay. Iraqi troops abandoned their posts leaving a trail of weapons and uniforms. This week ISIS posted a series of gruesome photos online, claiming the mass execution of 1,700 Iraqi soldiers. The photos could not be verified, but came amid a wave of documented killings of army, police and civilians connected to al-Maliki's government.

Some say this is a taste of what is to come in Mosul, and other places where the black flag of ISIS now flies. "ISIS has only been 10 days in Mosul…wait six months," interjects Hassan, a Syrian from the city of Raqqa, standing at the hotel. "At first they make you love them, but wait."

ISIS seized control of Raqqa in September 2013, after capturing the city alongside more moderate Syrian rebels. Hassan says the first months were relatively normal. But soon ISIS imposed strict Sharia law, mandating conservative dress and prayer and burning piles of cigarettes, which are seen as sinful. Those who broke the rules received public lashings.

"I think we are all waiting for the other shoe to drop," said Kenneth M. Pollack, a specialist in Middle East political-military affairs and a former CIA analyst. That it hasn’t dropped yet may be less a matter of ideology than one of resources, he says. If ISIS wants to build its Islamic caliphate from Mosul to Raqqa, it will need more than just the few thousand fighters it's estimated to have in Iraq.

"They have made some remarkable gains, but they are still really few in number and trying to control an enormous amount of space," says Pollack. "And they have a lot of competition in the form of the other Sunni militant groups and the Sunni tribes."

In Syria, ISIS now fights both the government of Bashar Al-Assad and other rebel groups. Facing the Sunni tribes of Iraq, and their latent military power, would put their new gains at riskso in places like Mosul, ISIS is staying on its best behavior. This approach seems to have brought them into a cautious alliance with the Sunni population that was disenfranchised for years by al-Maliki's Shi'ite-led government. But at some point ex-Baathist nationalism and ISIS's Islamic aspirations may clash.

"ISIS alone is never going to be able to hold this territory, never mind conquer more," said Pollack. "Right now they are minding their Ps and Qs because they are trying to recruit and trying to expand their control."

For Just $5,000, Match.com Will Find You a Date Who Looks Just Like Your Ex

Posted: 19 Jun 2014 11:12 AM PDT

If you think you can never move on from the love of your life — who recently informed you that the feeling is anything but mutual — signing up for an online dating service is probably the last thing on your mind. The parade of weirdos and just plain ugly people is enough to get you to swear off dating forever. All you want is your ex back, and nothing else will do.

So here’s a thought: what if you could date someone who looks just like your ex? That’s the idea behind a new “white-glove” dating service offered by Three Day Rule in conjunction with Match.com. For a mere $5000, you can send in photos of your ex, which Three Day Rule will use to help you find a more suitable suitor. Starting June 25, Match.com will send an email to targeted Match users inviting them to try the new approach. Initially emails will only go out to users in cities where Three Day Rule currently operates, including San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York and Chicago, but the offer will be extended as Three Day Rule expands to other cities.

“If you like one facial structure, you will probably like someone with a similar facial structure,” explains Three Day Rule founder Talia Goldstein, who notes that women are just as visually-oriented as men these days. Her high-end service doesn’t stop at scanning for lookalikes either: coaches will interview you in person and even go on pre-dates with potential matches to help weed out the bozos.

But here’s another thought: if the only way you can stomach online dating is by trying to find someone just like your ex, maybe what you really need is a time out instead. “Sometimes you need a little bit of time in between rather than jumping right back in,” says online dating coach Julie Spira. Once you do, consider dating against your type. “I'm always encouraging [daters] to jump out of their comfort zone,” says Spira. After all, changing things up may be what you really need to snap out of your dating funk.

Prosecutors: Gov. Walker Part of ‘Criminal Scheme’

Posted: 19 Jun 2014 11:10 AM PDT

(MADISON, Wis.) — Newly released documents show prosecutors are alleging Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker was at the center of a nationwide “criminal scheme” to illegally coordinate with outside conservative groups.

The documents were filed as part of an ongoing lawsuit challenging the probe by the conservative group Wisconsin Club for Growth. They were ordered publicly released Thursday by a federal appeals court judge after prosecutors and the Wisconsin Club for Growth did not object.

One of the filings from prosecutors outlines previously unknown details about the investigation that began in 2012 as Walker was facing a recall election.

Prosecutors say Walker, his chief of staff and others who worked for him were discussing illegal coordination with a number of national groups and prominent figures, including GOP strategist Karl Rove.

An American Attack on ISIS in Iraq Could Mean Retaliation Back Home

Posted: 19 Jun 2014 11:08 AM PDT

As fighters affiliated with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militant group seized Iraq's biggest oil refinery on Wednesday, the government formally asked the White House to respond to the miltants’ threat with airstrikes. The Obama administration has so far hesitated to do so, troubled by the lack of good intelligence on the ground and uneasy about the impact military force might have on a brewing conflict with deep sectarian overtones — though President Barack Obama announced Thursday the U.S. is sending 300 special forces to Iraq in an advisory, non-combat role.

But there’s another issue worth considering: the threat of violent blowback against the U.S. at home. For the moment, ISIS, which has fighters in Syria and Iraq, is focused on expanding its territory on both sides of the border. But an American attack on ISIS could turn the group’s wrath Westward, and it already has the means to retaliate on American shores.

Between an estimated 10,000 to 11,000 foreign fighters have joined the fight against President Bashar Assad in neighboring Syria, some 3,000 of whom have passports that allow them unfettered access to the U.S. and Europe. Most Westerners fighting in Syria say they want to defeat Assad and build a new nation based on the laws of Islam, but their governments fear they could be radicalized and persuaded to return home to attack Western targets.

While there have been several arrests of Europeans, Australians and Americans accused of fighting with or attempting to fight with terrorist groups in Syria, so far no plots against the West originating in Syria have been discovered. (The gunman accused of killing 4 at a Jewish museum in Brussels on May 24 had recently returned from fighting in Syria, but he appears to have been previously radicalized). But that could change rapidly if the United States attacks ISIS fighters directly: In January, ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi warned "Jews and crusaders" against encouraging more moderate groups to take on his organization in Syria: "Very soon you will be in direct confrontation, Allah permitting.”

ISIS fighters from across Europe are bringing in new recruits via social media, causing great concern. According to security officials from several European nations, about 400 British, 100 American and 700 French combatants, among others, have already joined the fight, turning what some may consider a distant war into an immediate threat at home.

“No one should be in any doubt that what we see in Syria and now in Iraq in terms of ISIS is the most serious threat to Britain’s security that there is today,” Prime Minister David Cameron told journalists Tuesday. "The number of foreign fighters in that area, the number of foreign fighters including those from the UK who could try to return to the UK is a real threat to our country." Cameron also warned warned Parliament this week that British fighters in Syria and Iraq pose "a greater threat to the UK than the return of foreign jihadists or fighters from the Afghanistan or Pakistan region."

And the threat isn't just to the UK. British citizens, of course, can easily travel to the U.S. There are now volunteers in Syria from almost every country in Europe, according to a recent report by the Soufan Group. In early June, Spanish authorities discovered a cell of Islamist militant recruiters in Melilla who they said had been sending volunteers to join insurgencies from Mali to Syria.

It’s unclear just how many Westerners, if any, joined ISIS on its blitzkrieg through northern Iraq, though at least two Danes and a Frenchman died in ISIS offensives in the north of the country earlier this year. There have been accounts of foreigners among the ISIS troops taking Mosul in last week's attack, but most were described as having North African, non-Iraqi Arab or Chechen accents. ISIS's Iraq campaign, which utilized the tactics of conventional war rather than guerilla-style suicide attacks, may have required seasoned jihadis over untrained but committed novices from the West.

In a way, though, that doesn't matter. ISIS, whose regional ambitions are reflected in its name, does not acknowledge the border that divides the two wings of its campaign. An attack on ISIS targets in Iraq is the same as one on ISIS targets in Syria. If Baghdadi or one of his lieutenants calls for revenge on the West, he is likely to find many willing — and able — volunteers.

The Apple-Amazon Fight Is Starting to Get Ugly

Posted: 19 Jun 2014 10:52 AM PDT

fortune-logo
This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at
Fortune.com.

Nobody in their right mind is going to swap an iPhone for an Amazon Fire — a shopping machine that calls itself a phone, as Quartz' Dan Frommer deftly put it.

That said, the smartphone unveiled by CEO Jeff Bezos in a Seattle warehouse Wednesday is a serious device that puts the business models of two tech giants in a new light.

"Apple and Amazon are much more alike than they are different," Asymco's Horace Dediu wrote last summer in an essay called The Anti-Apple. They're both in the business of "delighting customers" in controlled, predictable environments with convenience and ease of use. They both have huge customer bases (800 million for Apple, 250 million for Amazon). And now they both sell smartphones. For roughly the same price.

The main difference is that Apple's mission, as Tim Cook never tires of saying, is to make the very best products.

Amazon's Fire doesn't have to be the best. It just has to be good enough. Its mission is to make impulse buying at Amazon's growing retail empire even more friction-free. If it does that well – using a point-and-buy feature called Firefly — some portion of those 250 million customers will trade up for one.

But they won't trade down. Compared with an iPhone, Apple loyalists sniffed Wednesday, Fire's user interface is "a mess." It only runs, for now, on AT&T's network. There won't be a flood of new apps until developers are persuaded that it's going to take off. And because it uses a forked version of Android, it can't run apps purchased on either Apple's App Store or Google Play.

For the rest of the story, go to Fortune.com.

The Sweetest Video Game Sale of the Summer Is Finally Here

Posted: 19 Jun 2014 10:48 AM PDT

Valve’s Steam video game summer sale just went live at 1:00pm ET. This is Valve’s annual summer discount run that reaches across its substantial catalog of PC, Mac and Linux games, running from June 19 through Monday, June 30.

Today’s deals are already pretty big, like Firaxis’ superlative X-COM reboot, XCOM: Enemy Unknown for $8.49 (marked down a whopping 83%), CD Projekt’s roleplaying opus The Witcher 2 for $3.99 (down 80%), Ubisoft’s Far Cry 3 for $7.49 (down 75%) and the standalone expansion to Ironclad’s phenomenally well-crafted real-time strategy game, Sins of a Solar Empire: Rebellion, is $8.99 (down 80%).

Drop down the page and you’ll spy Valve’s “Flash” sales, running at shorter intervals, currently including the best first-person parkour (FPP!) game ever made, Mirror’s Edge, $4.99 (marked down 75%). Swing even lower and you’ll find Valve’s vote-a-thon section, whereby logged-in Steam members can pick which games they’d like to see go on sale next. And if you’d rather not dawdle waiting for the game you want to buy to go cha-ching, Valve lets you add it to a personal wish list, then notifies you when it’s available at a discount — a feature Valve notes you can use after the sale, too.

The clock’s ticking, counting down to the next round of deals, which arrive 24 hours from today’s 1:00pm ET kickoff.

Obama to Deploy Special Forces to Iraq

Posted: 19 Jun 2014 10:47 AM PDT

President Barack Obama announced Thursday that he’s prepared to deploy up to 300 special forces to Iraq, as militants who have plunged the country into chaos consolidate their gains.

Speaking to reporters from the White House Briefing Room, Obama said the green berets would be focused on training Iraqi troops to fight back against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), the Sunni, al-Qaeda inspired extremist group that has captured several cities and has its sights set on Baghdad. He emphasized that the U.S. was not returning to a fight it waged for eight years before a 2011 withdrawal, but was focused on training and helping foster a diplomatic solution to the current crisis.

“American forces will not be returning to combat in Iraq,” Obama said. “But we will help Iraqis as they take the fight to terrorists who threaten the Iraqi people, the region and American interests as well.”

Obama said that if conditions warrant, "we will be prepared to take targeted and precise military action." And focusing on the need for political reconciliation between Sunnis and Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s Shi-ite government, Obama said he would dispatch Secretary of State John Kerry to the region. But he left the onus on Iraqis to come together, declining to say whether Maliki should remain as the head of government. “It’s not the place for the United States to choose Iraq’s leaders,” Obama said.

“American combat troops are not going to be fighting in Iraq again,” he added. “We do not have the ability to simply solve this problem by sending in tens of thousands of of troops.”

Obama’s comments came after a long meeting with his national security team in the Situation Room. Many congressional Republicans have urged him to do more to stem the violence in Iraq, and Iraqi leaders themselves have asked for U.S. airstrikes. Despite the options he put on the table Thursday, Obama did his best to keep the focus on Iraqi leaders.

“Above all, Iraqi leaders must rise above their differences and come together around a political plan for Iraq’s future,” he said. “Shia, Sunni, Kurds, all Iraqis must have confidence that they can advance their interests and aspirations through the political process rather than through violence.”

Obama had been publicly weighing airstrikes on Iraq since last week, but at first officials ruled out any ground presence in Iraq. “We’re not considering boots on ground,” a senior Administration official said Thursday.

“We are not contemplating ground troops,” White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said later Thursday. But by Friday morning, the White House position was already more nuanced.

On Sunday, Obama ordered 170 American troops into Iraq to bolster security at the American Embassy in Baghdad, with another 100 ready to enter the country to secure airfields if needed.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi expressed concern over the deployment of U.S. troops as trainers in Iraq, alluding to Vietnam, where a U.S. training commitment snowballed into an all-out war.

“I think that you have to be careful sending special forces because it’s a number that has a tendency to grow,” she said before Obama’s statement. “And so I’d like to see the context, purpose, timeline and all the rest for anything like that.”

Obama cautioned Iran, which has also deployed forces to Iraq in support of the Shia-led government, against further destabilizing the situation, saying it could “play a constructive role” if it encourages reconciliation between rival sects. “If Iran is coming in solely as an armed force on behalf of the Shia and it—if it is framed in that fashion, then that probably worsens the situation and the prospect for a government formation that would actually be constructive over the long term,” he said.

10 Cars Americans Don’t Want to Buy

Posted: 19 Jun 2014 10:45 AM PDT

247-LogoVersions-114x57
This post is in partnership with 24/7 Wall Street. The article below was originally published on 247wallst.com.

The American auto industry nearly collapsed during the recession as car sales plummeted and companies struggled to stay afloat. Since then, U.S. car and light truck sales have steadily increased, reaching 1.6 million in May, up 11% from the year before.

Despite the general recovery, demand for some vehicles continues to underwhelm. According to figures from TrueCar, an auto industry information and technology platform, 15 models spent an average of at least 90 days on dealers' lots before being sold. No car took longer to turn over than the Volvo S60, at an average of 155.5 days.

Click here to see the ten cars Americans don't want to buy

Days to turn is useful metric for gauging inventory levels, Eric Lyman, vice president of industry insights at TrueCar, explained in an interview with 24/7 Wall St. "The clock starts when the car lands at the dealership," Lyman said. This levels the playing field, he added, because production facilities for various carmakers are located at different points across the U.S. or even in foreign countries.

According to Lyman, several factors may contribute to rising inventory levels. Some of these are temporary factors, such as the switch to a new model year. Because TrueCar data for 2014 covers cars in their 2014 model years, it makes sense that turnover rates are lower for models such as the GM's (NYSE: GM) GMC Yukon, Chevrolet Tahoe, and Cadillac Escalade, all of which have released newly overhauled 2015 models.

In other cases, Lyman added, "high inventory is going to be [due] to a disconnect between the sales goals of the manufacturer and the retail demand for those units." In some instances, manufacturers overestimate demand for their brands and ship too many units to their dealers. This results in high inventory and turnover levels for the brands.

Many of the brands that take the longest to sell are unpopular with customers, Lyman explained. Both Mitsubishi and Scion have car models that take the most days to turn. Both were also two of the nation's lowest rated car brands, according to J.D. Power's 2013 Automotive Performance, Execution and Layout Study, which measures brands' appeal with car buyers.

Cars from Cadillac, Ford's (NYSE: F) Lincoln, Jaguar and Volvo, all of which ranked in the bottom half of premium brands, according to the study, also made the list. Only one of the cars with the highest days to turn, the Chevrolet Tahoe, was manufactured by one of the survey's 10 highest rated non-premium brands.

Although there are differences in how brands are perceived, Lyman added that disparities in actual quality among various brands is often relatively small. Five of the 10 cars requiring the most days to sell were made by brands with above-average scores on J.D. Power's 2013 Initial Quality Study. Leading these brands was GMC, maker of the Yukon, which trailed only Porsche for fewest problems per 100 cars, according to the Survey. Only three models belonged to brands with scores considerably below the industry average, although one of these, Scion, was the lowest-rated brand in J.D. Power's survey.

Based on figures provided by TrueCar, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the car models with the highest number of days to turn. TrueCar turnover and sales data for each model reference a particular model year — figures for 2013 apply to cars in their 2013 model year, while figures for 2014 count data for 2014 model year vehicles. TrueCar also provided sales data for each of these models. Manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP) data are from manufacturer's website, and refer to the newest model year. We also relied on information from J.D. Power and Consumer Reports surveys, and the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). Safety data are from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Sales figures are from The Wall Street Journal, as well as various company press releases.

These are the cars Americans don't want to buy.

3. Cadillac Escalade
> Days to turn: 115.5
> Jan.-May unit sales: 1,498
> MSRP: $71,695

The Cadillac Escalade is one of three full-size General Motors SUVs among the 10 cars with the longest days to turn, alongside Chevrolet's Tahoe and GMC's Yukon. It is also the slowest selling American manufactured car, taking an average of 115.5 days to turn in the first five months of 2014. This is up from 61.2 days to turn between January and May 2013, as sales have dropped 14.7% year-over-year. However, this may not necessarily be an issue of quality. General Motors recently released a new Escalade, which may affect sales and turnover for the 2014 model year. In fact, Cadillac was one of the top-ranked makes in J.D. Power's 2014 Vehicle Dependability Study, behind only Lexus and Mercedes-Benz. Consumers were also happy with the brand, awarding it one of the industry's highest ACSI scores.

2. Mitsubishi Outlander
> Days to turn: 117.1
> Jan.-May unit sales: 3,788
> MSRP: $22,995

The Mitsubishi Outlander took dealers an average of 117.1 days to turn so far this year. This was actually an improvement from last year, when it took dealers nearly 128 days to turn an Outlander. Sales of the Outlander have also been strong this year, up 37% in the first five months of 2014 versus the year before. Overall, sales of Mitsubishi cars rose nearly 34% in that time. However, the carmaker still holds just a 0.5% share of the U.S. car market. Mitsubishi's model competes in a crowded field against some of the nation's best selling cars, such as Toyota's RAV4, Honda's CR-V and Ford's Escape.

ALSO READ: Ten States with the Fastest Growing Economies

1. Volvo S60
> Days to turn: 155.5
> Jan.-May unit sales: 1,777
> MSRP: $33,300

Volvo's S60 had the longest average days to turn of any car model sold in the U.S., taking an average of 155.5 days to turn in the first five months of 2014. This was more than twice as long as it took to turn an S60 last year. Sales of the S60 have slid as well, with just 1,777 sold this year through May, down 13% from the same period in 2013. So far this year, total Volvo sales are down roughly 10% nationwide. As a brand, Volvo has long been considered a carmaker in need of a turnaround. Ford sold it to Chinese carmaker Geely in 2010. The brand still maintains a reputation for safety, and the S60 earned a five star safety rating from the NHTSA and was an IIHS Top Safety Pick+ last year.

For the rest of the list, for to 24/7Wall St.

Read more from 24/7 Wall St.:

Volkswagen's Sales Disaster Continues

Americans Watch Only 17 TV Channel

What to Do If You Won the $149 Million Powerball Lottery

 

 

 

0 comments:

Post a Comment