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Thursday, July 17, 2014

Elaine Stritch on Learning About Yourself: “They’re Hard Lessons”

Elaine Stritch on Learning About Yourself: “They’re Hard Lessons”


Elaine Stritch on Learning About Yourself: “They’re Hard Lessons”

Posted: 17 Jul 2014 12:01 PM PDT

Elaine Stritch, who died Thursday at 89, was best known as the legendary stage performer who made Broadway brassier — but her most recent acclaimed performance had been as herself. Stritch was the subject of a documentary, Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me, which was released in February.

Then, Stritch spoke to TIME about the release of the film. What she had to say about seeing herself on film in that manner was a lesson that can apply much more broadly:

What did you learn about yourself from [making the documentary]?

A great deal. They're hard lessons to learn. You have to stand up, throw your shoulders back and say, 'Go ahead, hit me.' I think I'm better at it than I used to be. Especially when the reaction to the show was good. I think that helps a lot, when they're entertained. Because I wouldn't do a documentary unless I made it entertaining, and that does not necessarily mean lies. If you make a lot of lies up that make you look fun and up and attractive and all those good things, what good does it do anybody else? But if you really tell the honest-to-God truth, I think it's a pretty revealing experiment. I think it makes a documentary honest, and your honesty spreads, and I think people are affected by it and tell the truth as well. You get a lot of people sitting around telling the truth, and you get a pretty interesting documentary.

Stritch also told TIME that, as of February, though she had left New York City for a quieter life, it wouldn’t be accurate to call her retired.

“That is not accurate at all,” she said. “I'd be thrilled to death to find a good new play.”

Photos: Aftermath of Malaysia Airlines Crash in Ukraine

Posted: 17 Jul 2014 11:49 AM PDT

Mia Farrow, Lena Dunham and Others Remember Elaine Stritch

Posted: 17 Jul 2014 11:42 AM PDT

Elaine Stritch, the Broadway extraordinaire whose career spanned theatre, cinema and television, died Thursday at 89 in her home in Birmingham, Mich. A slew of Twitter reactions to Stritch’s death speak to her influence on the current generation of artists.

Here is what members of the communities she was a part of tweeted in her memory:

Elaine Stritch, Great Dame of Broadway

Posted: 17 Jul 2014 11:40 AM PDT

The Beer List at This Bar Looks Like a Stock Ticker

Posted: 17 Jul 2014 11:38 AM PDT

The Beer Exchange

A bar in Kalamazoo, Michigan, takes the fun of happy hour to a whole new level.

The Beer Exchange has been going viral on Reddit and Imgur in the last day because its beer list resembles a stock ticker — or a Bloomberg Terminal that dispenses alcohol. It displays the current prices for various kinds of beer, and as demand for the different types ebbs and flows, the prices rise and fall. Once in a while, there's even a market crash that brings the beverages to their all-time low.

It's a happy hour all the time—as long as you're interested in the right beer. But unlike stock trading, there's no reward for buying low and selling high. Besides getting buzzed, that is.

How Fluently Do You Speak Emoji?

Posted: 17 Jul 2014 11:13 AM PDT

(Note: most emoji definitions sourced from Emojipedia.)

Exclusive: Separatist Leader Says Rebels Did Not Shoot Down Flight MH17

Posted: 17 Jul 2014 11:07 AM PDT

The pro-Russia separatist leader was not in a mood to discuss the downing of a passenger plane over eastern Ukraine on Thursday. He had heard about it on the news – 280 passengers and 15 crew on a Malaysia Airlines flight from Amsterdam to Kuala Lampur – possibly shot out of the sky with a missile or some other projectile over the war-ravaged region of Donetsk.

Ukrainian officials had already laid the blame on the separatist rebels in that region. So who was responsible? Oleg Tsarev, one of the leaders of the breakaway Donetsk People's Republic, said the rebels did not shoot the plane down. "We don't have weapons that can take down a plane from that altitude," he told TIME, minutes after news of the crash broke.

But only three weeks ago they had plenty of those weapons. At the end of June, the Russian state media had congratulated the rebels on their latest military acquisition – a set of Russian-made BUK missile launchers seized from a Ukrainian air force base. "The Donetsk resistance fighters have captured an anti-aircraft military station," declared the Kremlin's main television network Vesti, which has been cheering on the rebel fighters since the war in eastern Ukraine began this spring. "The skies above Donetsk will now be protected by the BUK surface-to-air missile complex," said the headline on the channel's website.

The rebels quickly seemed to put their new rockets to work. The downing of Ukrainian military aircraft has become almost commonplace in recent days. An AN-26 military transport plane was shot down on Monday over eastern Ukraine, and the rebel leaders confirmed the same day that they had taken its four crew members hostage after they had ejected to safety. In the two days that followed, another two Ukrainian military aircraft, both of them SU-25 fighter jets, were reportedly shot down by the rebels. And Russian media trumpeted another rebel strike late on Thursday afternoon, claiming that a Ukrainian AN-24 had gone down over the town of Torez.

That was just a few hours before reports first emerged in the Russian media that Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 had been shot down over the town of Torez, just near the Russian border with Ukraine. The Ukrainian government and the rebel leaders immediately began trading blame. But the separatists' claims that they lacked the firepower to shoot down that plane rang hollow. Asked about the BUK missiles that the rebels acquired in June – and apparently used successfully since then against the Ukrainian military – Tsarev said, "I have no more information for you," and hung up the phone.

 

LIRR Strike Averted Through Tentative Agreement

Posted: 17 Jul 2014 11:06 AM PDT

NEW YORK (AP) — A tentative agreement was announced Thursday that averts a strike by workers at the nation’s largest commuter railroad.

“It’s my pleasure to announce today that we have settled a four-year dispute dealing with the Long Island Rail Road labor unions,” Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who personally guided the negotiations in the closing hours, announced at a news conference.

Eight unions representing 5,400 LIRR workers had threatened to strike this weekend unless an agreement was reached. The workers had been seeking a new deal since 2010.

Details of the agreement were not immediately announced, but Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chairman Thomas Prendergast said the deal provides a “fair and reasonable contract” that protects commuters and the fiscal health of the MTA.

Chief union negotiator Anthony Simon said his membership was reluctant to strike, but a tough stance was necessary in order to get an agreement.

“This was definitely about the riders,” Simon said. “We cared about the financial stability of the railroad as well as the members and their financial stability.”

Officials in New York City and Long Island had predicted dire consequences if workers walked off the job. Approximately 300,000 riders used the railroad daily.

Earlier this week it appeared a strike was likely when union negotiators and MTA officials said that they had reached an impasse.

Cuomo, a Democrat who is running for re-election, jump-started the talks on Wednesday when he appealed to both sides to resume negotiating. The governor held discussions with the sides later that day and on Thursday morning summoned them to his office.

President Barack Obama had appointed two emergency boards to help resolve the dispute, in December 2013 and May of this year, but the MTA rejected both nonbinding recommendations. The emergency board’s last proposal called for a 17 percent raise over six years while leaving work rules and pensions alone.

The MTA offered a 17 percent wage increase over seven years but also wants pension and health care concessions, which both sides said was the sticking point holding up an agreement.

Ahead of the threatened strike, the MTA released a contingency plan that included shuttling commuters by school bus from selected LIRR stations to subway stops in New York City, and opening several large park-and-ride parking lots, but officials concede a strike would snarl traffic throughout the region and create a commuting nightmare for millions.

The MTA and others also said thousands of employees planned work from home.

The state comptroller, Thomas DiNapoli, had estimated a strike would be a “devastating blow” to a region that is still struggling to recover from Superstorm Sandy and the recession. He estimated economic losses of $50 million a day.

Elaine Stritch, Great Dame of Broadway, Dead at 89

Posted: 17 Jul 2014 11:02 AM PDT

Updated: 2:07 p.m. ET Thursday

Elaine Stritch, the Broadway musical theater actress who was best known for her salty personality and and star power even into old age, died Thursday in Birmingham, Mich. at 89.

She’s one of only stage actresses who worked consistently from the golden age of American theater through to the present. She first starred in a 1952 revival of “Pal Joey,” then a 1955 production of William Inge’s “Bus Stop,” and then played Martha in Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolf” from 1962-1964. But she got her big break in 1970, in Stephen Sondheim’s “Company.” She became known as one of the best actresses to interpret Sondheim’s work, which she did again in 2009 in “A Little Night Music.”

Stritch was a theater actress first and foremost, but she also had a successful movie and television career. She most recently played Jack Donaghy’s mother Colleen on 30 Rock when she was already in her 80s, but also made two movies with Woody Allen (September, in 1987 and Small Time Crooks in 2000) over a career that spanned six decades. The stage was her true home, however– whether it was musicals, dramatic plays, or one-women shows, Stritch’s biggest fans wanted to see her in person.

But perhaps her greatest role was playing herself, as the caustic grand dame of the Broadway theater. She won her last Tony for a one-woman show, “Elaine Stritch at Liberty”, in which she sang, danced and told stories to packed houses.

“I'm a funny age — funny ha-ha, funny peculiar, funny, funny. I could hardly open my mouth on the stage without getting a laugh,” she told the New York Times in January. “That's a pretty sensational thing to brag about, but it's also dangerous. I had a great time, and I'm very glad it's over. Oh, my God, it's hard. Entertaining is hard.”

Here’s a trailer for a documentary about Stritch’s life released earlier this year:

U.S. Warned Of Unsafe Airspace Over Crimea, But Not Where MH17 Crashed

Posted: 17 Jul 2014 10:50 AM PDT

Earlier this year the Federal Aviation Administration banned American air carriers from flying over part of the disputed area between Russia and Ukraine over safety concerns, but the area where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashed on Thursday was not included in this restricted airspace.

The agency warned American aircraft on April 25 against flying over the Crimean peninsula and the surrounding waters after Russia, which had moved to annex the territory, claimed control over that airspace.

“In the FAA’s view, the potential for civil aircraft to receive confusing and conflicting air traffic control instructions from both Ukrainian and Russian ATS providers while operating in the portion of the Simferopol (UKFV) FIR covered by this SFAR is unsafe and presents a potential hazard to civil flight operations in the disputed airspace,” the agency wrote. “In addition, political and military tension between Ukraine and the Russian Federation remains high, and compliance with air traffic control instructions issued by the authorities of one country could result in a civil aircraft being misidentified as a threat and intercepted or otherwise engaged by air defense forces of the other country.”

But the Donetsk region where Flight 17 reportedly crashed is roughly 200 miles northeast from the restricted zone. The map below was included in the FAA advisory.

 

 

FAA

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