Pages

Friday, July 4, 2014

Joey Chestnut Scarfs Down 61 Hot Dogs in 10 Minutes to Win Coney Island Contest

Joey Chestnut Scarfs Down 61 Hot Dogs in 10 Minutes to Win Coney Island Contest


Joey Chestnut Scarfs Down 61 Hot Dogs in 10 Minutes to Win Coney Island Contest

Posted: 04 Jul 2014 10:53 AM PDT

Feeling stuffed after that third hot dog? Imagine eating 61. That’s how many hot dogs (and buns!) Joey ‘Jaws’ Chestnut ate to keep his champion title at the annual Nathan’s Famous Fourth of July Hot Dog Eating Contest at Coney Island, New York.

There’s a new champion in town on the women’s side, though. Miki Sudo, a 28-year-old from Las Vegas, consumed 34 hot dogs and buns in 10 minutes to unseat three-time defending champion Sonya Thomas, also known as the “Black Widow.” Thomas fell more than six hot dogs short of the winner after eating a record 45 hot dogs last year.

Prior to the beginning of the event, which was broadcast live on ESPN, Chesnut proposed to his girlfriend, also a competitive eater.

7 of Roger Ebert’s Most Brutal Movie Reviews

Posted: 04 Jul 2014 10:25 AM PDT

The long Fourth of July weekend is another kind of holiday for film lovers: The documentary about beloved film critic Roger Ebert, Life Itself, hits theaters and on-demand services Friday. Directed by Steve James (Hoop Dreams), the film began as a loose adaptation of Ebert's 2011 memoir of the same name, but as Ebert's health declined — he was diagnosed with cancer in 2002 — the documentary became a frank, revealing and sometimes hard-to-watch look at his final days before his death in 2013. “I think it's so poetic that a man like Roger, who spent his whole life reviewing movies, ends up ending his life on the big screen,” Ebert's wife, Chaz Ebert, told Flavorwire in a recent interview.

Some of those movies he reviewed over the years were great — others, not so much. Reading Ebert's passionate praise of exemplary filmmaking was a treat for readers, but his take-downs of the very worst of box offices provided another kind of joy. Here are seven of his most entertaining negative reviews.

Valentine's Day
Giving it two stars, Ebert didn’t totally trash this star-studded rom-com from 2010, but he also concluded his review with some sage dating advice: “Valentine’s Day is being marketed as a Date Movie. I think it’s more of a First-Date Movie. If your date likes it, do not date that person again. And if you like it, there may not be a second date.”

North
Ebert disliked North so much, one of the collections of his most negative reviews, I Hated, Hated, Hated This Movie, gets its name from his 1994 take: “I hated this movie. Hated hated hated hated hated this movie. Hated it. Hated every simpering stupid vacant audience-insulting moment of it. Hated the sensibility that thought anyone would like it. Hated the implied insult to the audience by its belief that anyone would be entertained by it.”

Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen
Nobody really watches Michael Bay films expecting critically acclaimed works of art, but Ebert's review of the 2009 blockbuster is just as fun, if not more: “[The movie] is a horrible experience of unbearable length, briefly punctuated by three or four amusing moments. One of these involves a dog-like robot humping the leg of the heroine. Such are the meager joys.”

Caligula
Ebert admitted he couldn't even make it all the way through the film in his 1980 review: “Caligula is sickening, utterly worthless, shameful trash. If it is not the worst film I have ever seen, that makes it all the more shameful: People with talent allowed themselves to participate in this travesty. Disgusted and unspeakably depressed, I walked out of the film after two hours of its 170-minute length … Caligula is not good art, it is not good cinema, and it is not good porn.”

Police Academy
This 1984 attempt at poking fun at cop movies failed miserably: “It’s so bad, maybe you should pool your money and draw straws and send one of the guys off to rent it so that in the future, whenever you think you’re sitting through a bad comedy, he could shake his head, and chuckle tolerantly, and explain that you don’t know what bad is.”

Deuce Bigalo: European Gigalo
This 2005 piece also inspired the title of Ebert's second collection of reviews about the worst movies: “[Deuce star Rob] Schneider retaliated by attacking [ex-Los Angeles Times columnist Patrick] Goldstein in full-page ads … 'Maybe you didn’t win a Pulitzer Prize because they haven’t invented a category for Best Third-Rate, Unfunny Pompous Reporter Who’s Never Been Acknowledged by His Peers.' … As chance would have it, I have won the Pulitzer Prize, and so I am qualified. Speaking in my official capacity as a Pulitzer Prize winner, Mr. Schneider, your movie sucks.”

Mad Dog Time
The first line of this 1996 review doesn't hold back: “Mad Dog Time is the first movie I have seen that does not improve on the sight of a blank screen viewed for the same length of time. Oh, I’ve seen bad movies before. But they usually made me care about how bad they were. Watching Mad Dog Time is like waiting for the bus in a city where you’re not sure they have a bus line.”

Priest Convicted of Killing Nun Dies in Prison

Posted: 04 Jul 2014 10:12 AM PDT

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — A Roman Catholic priest convicted in 2006 of killing a nun in an Ohio hospital chapel two decades earlier has died. The Rev. Gerald Robinson was 76.

Robinson was serving 15 years to life in prison. His attorney, Richard Kerger, says the family told him Robinson died Friday morning at a Columbus prison hospice unit.

A federal court had refused Thursday to release Robinson so he could die in his hometown, Toledo.

Robinson was convicted of strangling and stabbing Sister Margaret Ann Pahl during Easter weekend in 1980. Church historians have said it’s the only documented case of a priest killing a nun.

Prosecutors say Pahl’s domineering ways angered Robinson. They say he tried to humiliate Pahl in her death. Her wounds formed an upside-down cross.

Robinson maintained his innocence.

Germany Arrests Man Said to Be U.S. Spy

Posted: 04 Jul 2014 09:56 AM PDT

A German man was arrested this week on charges of spying for foreign intelligence services, a German official confirmed to TIME on Friday.

Another official, German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s spokesman Steffen Siebert, said Merkel was informed about the arrest on Thursday. The 31-year-old man was not identified and German authorities didn’t divulge who they suspect him of spying for. But the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung, citing unnamed government sources, reported that he had been spying on behalf of the United States.

Tensions have been high between Germany and the U.S. ever since documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden revealed that the intelligence agency had monitored Merkel’s personal cell phone. U.S. officials didn’t weigh in on the latest report: The White House declined to comment Friday, and an official readout of a Thursday phone call between Merkel and President Barack Obama made no mention of it.

Süddeutsche Zeitung reported that the man, who was arrested Wednesday, is an employee of the German Federal Intelligence Service, and that he was initially arrested on suspicion of spying for Russia. He appeared at a federal court in Karlsruhe in southwest Germany on Thursday, and has been detained on suspicion of being a foreign spy while authorities investigate further.

News of his arrest came a day after two U.S. citizens who once worked for the NSA testified before a German parliamentary committee investigating the agency’s overseas surveillance activities.

-Additional reporting by Zeke J Miller and Denver Nicks

Transformers Smashes Tammy at Start of Slower Box Office Weekend

Posted: 04 Jul 2014 09:34 AM PDT

Transformers: Age of Extinction netted almost $10 million at the box office on Thursday, adding to the $100 million it earned last weekend and transforming Tammy into a dud as Hollywood kicked off what looks to be a quieter-than-usual Fourth of July weekend.

The science fiction film is expected to earn another $55 to $60 million by the end of the holiday weekend, Variety reports, but the weekend is shaping up to be far less lucrative than in previous blockbuster years. Early figures show Tammy, which opened Wednesday, coming in second at the box office. The Melissa McCarthy comedy netted $5.5 million, Variety reports.

Other movies rounding out the top five earners Thursday included the family friendly Earth to Echo, horror film Deliver Us From Evil, and comedy 22 Jump Street.

The Independence Day weekend typically yields high profits for Hollywood, but this year’s offerings are on track to earn less than usual.

Dad Charged in Son’s Hot-Car Death Asked About Life Insurance, Police Say

Posted: 04 Jul 2014 08:40 AM PDT

Justin Ross Harris, the Georgia father accused of murdering his toddler by leaving him in a sweltering SUV, had asked family members how to cash in on the boy's life insurance policies, investigators said. The disturbing detail was revealed in search warrants released Friday.

A judge denied the Marietta man bond on Thursday. Prosecutors laid out a possible motive for why Harris allegedly left his 22-month-old son, Cooper, in the car while he was at work June 18. A detective testified that Harris was unhappy in his marriage, had been sexting with other women and had visited websites about the "child-free" life…

Read the rest of the story on NBC News

Pentagon Grounds Entire F-35 Fleet

Posted: 04 Jul 2014 08:04 AM PDT

The Department of Defense grounded the United States' entire fleet of F-35 fighter jets after a fire at Eglin Air Base in Florida raised questions about the safety of the aircraft, officials said Thursday.

The cause of the June 23 runway fire, which occurred as a pilot was preparing for takeoff, remains under investigation, the Pentagon said. The pilot was not hurt in the incident.

“Additional inspections of F-35 engines have been ordered, and return to flight will be determined based on inspection results and analysis of engineering data,” the Pentagon said in a statement late Thursday.

With a price tag of $400 billion, the single-seater F-35 fighter jet is the single most expensive weapon ever built. The program has been plagued by cost overruns and scheduling delays.

Pictures of the Week: June 27 – July 4

Posted: 04 Jul 2014 08:00 AM PDT

From the killing of three kidnapped Israeli teenagers and Tim Howard’s World Cup heroics to the beginning of Ramadan and Hurricane Arthur photographed from space, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

Turtle vs. Dog Is the Best Soccer Match You’ll See During the World Cup

Posted: 04 Jul 2014 07:41 AM PDT

The World Cup this year has been even more packed than most with high-intensity, hair-raising games, but none of them holds a candle to this matchup for the ages: turtle v.s. dog.

Posted to Facebook under the title "Italian soccer :) ( a.k.a. also a turtle and a dog can manage …" by Valeria D’Innocenzo Carlantoni in Civitavechia, Italy, a small town near Rome, this 1:17-long clip features some surprisingly cheeky touches and fancy footwork. The aggressive tackle at the end is exceptional, though it's a miracle no one got carded.

If you've been rooting for the U.S., soothe your broken heart (which should still be celebrating the OMG-mind-blowingly awesome performance of U.S. goalie Tim Howard) with this clip.

Try and watch this video without, at least in your head, narrating the action in a game announcer voice. This needs to be the World Cup's version of the Puppy Bowl.

In the Wake of Apparent Revenge Killing, New Israeli ‘Kidnap App’ Adapted for Palestinians

Posted: 04 Jul 2014 07:39 AM PDT

In the first two weeks after three Israeli teenagers were abducted on the West Bank, over 60,000 Israelis downloaded a new smartphone app designed to alert police to your abduction and guide them to the place you are being held. Then a Palestinian teen earlier this week was forced into a car and killed in what police suspect was a revenge killing, hastening development of an Arabic version of the same free software.

The SOS app was developed by the volunteer rescue service United Hatzalah, by adapting software originally designed for its state-of-the-art emergency medical response network. After the June 12 abduction of Naftali Fraenkel and Gilad Shaar, both 16, and Eyal Yifrach, 19, the software was quickly stripped down to a simple kidnap alert, offered for free online in Apple, Android and Blackberry versions.

But the app is currently offered only in Hebrew, the language of Israel’s Jewish majority—and until this week, the population that felt most threatened by abduction. In the 18 months before the June 12 abduction of the three teens, authorities detected more than 80 kidnap plots by Palestinian militants to snatch Israelis, driven largely by the lopsided rate of exchange an Israeli captive brings in ransom bargaining: in 2011, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu freed 1,027 Palestinian prisoners for one captive soldier, Gilad Shalit.

But now Palestinians also feel vulnerable, after the abduction and murder of 16-year-old Muhammad Abu Khdeir. Local residents said an attempt had been made a day earlier to carry away a child of nine on the same street.

“The app is currently being developed in Arabic,” says Ilana Conway, a spokesperson for the nonprofit rescue service. “United Hatzalah’s main aim is to save lives—they don’t discriminate on whose lives these are.” She adds that the service has a major operations center in mostly Arab East Jerusalem as well as in the Jewish west side of the city, and more than 300 Israeli Arab volunteers nationwide.

Digital media already have figured prominently in the drama of the last three weeks. Tensions over the deaths may be playing out in the streets—which in East Jerusalem erupted in riots again on Friday, when Abu Khdeir was laid to rest—but the details driving emotions have arrived from the increasingly intimate interface of devices with everyday life. Shortly after the hitchhiking yeshiva student Gilad Shaer climbed into a car that turned out to be driven by kidnappers, he discreetly opened his phone and dialed 100, Israel’s version of 911 and whispered, “I’ve been kidnapped.”

The digital recording of his call was released after the discovery of his body, and those of Naftali Fraenkel and Eyal Yifrah, and fueled not only rage at the police—who took the call for a prank—but also at the killers: The recording appears to have captured the murder. The kidnappers are heard shouting for their captive to get down, then gunshots are heard, followed by the sound one of the killers announcing in Arabic, “God bless your hands, we have brought three,” followed by singing.

Released on the day the three were buried together, the audio redoubled demands for vengeance, which appeared mostly online. The Facebook group “The People of Israel Demand Revenge” recorded 35,000 likes in two days. In Jerusalem, hundreds of Jewish extremists rampaged in the streets chanting “Death to the Arabs” and confronting people with dark skin. Abu Khadeir was forced into a car in front of his house a few hours later. Police reportedly located his charred body, barely an hour later, by tracking the signal from his cell phone to a forest on the western edge of Jerusalem.

That hour would be the amount of time it often takes police in Israel to get the court order required to track a cell signal—a major advantage of the so-called kidnap app, says Eli Beer, the founder and president of United Hatzalah, who spoke to TIME before the Palestinian youth was killed.

Beer noted that Israeli law requires a judge’s specific permission to track a cell signal, a fact that might not have changed the outcome for the Jewish Israeli teens even if the police had taken Gilad Shaer’s call seriously. But the SOS app broadcasts GPS coordinates automatically to the rescue service's 24-hour dispatch center, from which it is shared with police. “Police need to go to judge to ask the phone company the location of [the] phone,” says Beer. “We solved that problem for the police.”

The application is simple enough: "You open the app and swipe it,” Beer explains, “and three seconds later, it sends a signal.” The lag was installed in case the alert was activated by mistake. But it can only be cancelled after entering a code, a precaution added to prevent someone else (say, the kidnapper) from canceling the alert.

The SOS app was designed by NowForce, an Israeli software company catering to first responders. It amounts to a stripped-down version of an application developed seven years ago, which located the United Hatzalah trained volunteer nearest an emergency, and dispatched the volunteer to the scene– often on a motorcycle ambulance dubbed an "ambucycle," another of the organization’s innovations.

The system did much to trim the average response time for calls inside Israel to just three minutes, claims Beer—which he says is already the fastest response time in the world. The goal is 90 seconds, and the GPS technology in smartphones should help close the gap. "We deal with 211,000 emergencies every year in Israel," Beer says, "so we know how long it takes to get the location correct. It's a big part of the call."

No calls are ignored, he says. “We don't' take any call non-seriously,” says Beer. “Even it sounds crank, we make 100 percent sure.”

0 comments:

Post a Comment