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Saturday, July 19, 2014

Officials: Gunmen Kill At Least 15 Egypt Troops

Officials: Gunmen Kill At Least 15 Egypt Troops


Officials: Gunmen Kill At Least 15 Egypt Troops

Posted: 19 Jul 2014 11:11 AM PDT

(CAIRO) — At least 15 Egyptian border guard troops were killed in an attack Saturday by gunmen using rocket-propelled grenades in the country’s western desert, security officials said.

An Interior Ministry official and a military official said the gunmen opened fire at a checkpoint in the western desert governorate of Wadi el-Gedid, on the Farafra Oasis Road, about 500 kilometers (310 miles) from Cairo. Farafra is the country’s western most oasis, near the border with Libya.

The officials said three attackers were killed in ensuing clashes. A medical official said five troops, including officers, were wounded.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to journalists.

Egypt’s state news agency MENA said this is the second time this border patrol company has come under attack from gunmen in the last few months. An earlier attack killed five troops, the agency said.

Egypt has long, porous borders with Sudan and Libya used by arms smugglers. Egypt has been flooded with weapons, mostly from Libya, following the 2011 civil war that toppled longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

Weird Al Yankovic Makes Fun of Your First World Problems

Posted: 19 Jul 2014 10:29 AM PDT

The sixth installment of Weird Al Yankovic’s eight videos in eight days campaign takes a stab at those of us with First World problems. If you’ve ever been plagued with petty inconveniences like un-foamed coffee, bills to large for a vending machine, filling up on bread at lunch and not leaving room for tiramisu, then you’ve got First World problems. In a song set to the musical styling of the Pixies, Weird Al dons a blonde wig and plays a spoiled, rich man whose life appears to be a series of frustrations borne from having too little to worry about.

Embedding of the video won’t be available until July 21, but you can watch it here now.

Protests Against Israel Ramp Up as Gaza Operation Continues

Posted: 19 Jul 2014 09:11 AM PDT

Protests against the Israeli bombardment of Gaza intensified in global capitals from London to Istanbul Friday and Saturday, as Israel ramped up its military operations on the the Palestinian-controlled territory.

Thousands of protestors gathered in central London on Saturday to call for an end to Israeli military action in Gaza, with about 15,000 expected to take part in a march to the Israeli embassy in Kensington, the Guardian reports. The march comes a day after police removed 25 protestors who held banners reading “Stop arming Israel” while linking arms in London’s Whitehall building.

In Indian-controlled Kashmir, government forces on Saturday fired on protestors rallying against Israel’s invasion of Gaza, killing a teenage boy, Haaretz reports. Protestors have gathered in Kashmir every day since Israel launched its military campaign in Gaza, and have burned Israeli flags throughout the region.

Protestors in Istanbul pelted the Israeli consulate with stones this week, and in Ankara, draped Palestinian flags on the ambassador’s residence, Reuters reports. Israel responded Friday by reducing its diplomatic presence in the country.

In Berlin on Thursday, some protestors chanted anti-Semitic remarks after a pro-Palestinian demonstration, saying "Jew, Jew, cowardly pig, come on out and fight,” according to Haaretz.

The recent spate of violence between Israel and Hamas has claimed the lives of more than 300 Palestinians in the Gaza strip, as many as three-quarters of which have been civilians. Palestinian rocket fire into Israel has killed one Israeli. Israel has sent troops into Gaza in order to stop the rocket bombardment into its borders.

These 5 Yoga Moves Will Save You From Back Pain

Posted: 19 Jul 2014 09:00 AM PDT

The key to preventing back pain is to strengthen your core and release tension and tightness in the muscles around your upper and lower back. Plus, back pain can often be the result of stress. Yoga will help you relax and unwind mentally and these poses will continue to keep your core strong, your back supported, and your muscles lengthened and released.

Health.com: 15 Natural Back Pain Remedies

The first three yoga poses below connect us to our deep core muscles, which act as an inner girdle. When we tighten and tone our core, it helps us hold everything in and prevents us from straining our back. The last two are great for releasing tension in the upper and lower body. Tight shoulders can cause an achy upper back and tight hips pull on the lower back.

Try incorporating these poses regularly to keep your spine healthy, back strong, core engaged, and joints flexible.

Bird Dog

Start on hands and knees and imagine you have a glass of water on your lower back and one between your shoulder blades. Without spilling any water, reach your right arm forward and your left leg straight back behind you. Hold here for 30-60 seconds bracing your core. Come back to all fours before switching sides. Repeat 3 to 5 times on each side.

Health.com: 12 Yoga Poses for Non-Flexible People

Boat

Sit tall your knees bent and your feet on flat on the floor. Hinge back without rounding in the lower back as you lift your legs out in front of you at a 45-degree angle. Keep drawing our lower abdominals in and up and lengthen out of your lower back. Hold here for 5 to 8 breaths. Lower down and repeat 2 more times.

If this is too challenging with your legs straight, you can bend your knees so the shins are parallel to the floor.

Forearm Plank

If you only have time for one pose, this is the ultimate core move. It really works the entire midsection, deep core muscles and the back, waist, hips, legs, buttocks, arms, and shoulders.

Lie on your and place your elbows under your shoulders, tuck under your toes and press firmly through the back of your legs and heels. Engage your lower abs and tighten your core as you lift your body up off the floor coming in to one straight line of energy from head to toe. Don't let your ribs splay open or your butt sag or lift too high. Hold for 45-60 seconds then lower down. Repeat 2 to 3 more times.

Health.com: 25 Exercises You Can Do Anywhere

Cow Face Pose

Start on all fours and slide your right leg over your left leg high at the upper thigh. Sit back between your heels and adjust your hips so they are even distance from each foot. Lift your left arm overhead and bend the elbow so the hand comes down between your shoulder blades. Reach your right arm behind your back and up towards the left hand try and touch the fingers or clasp the hands. If you can't connect your hands, use a towel or strap. Recline forward over your legs and hold for 5 to 8 breaths. Come up move back on to all fours and repeat on the opposite side.

This pose will stretch out tight external rotators, hips, and buttocks as well as shoulders and upper back.

Camel Pose

Tight hip flexors can pull on the lower back and are often the result of sitting for too long of periods. Camel is an excellent counterpose to the slouched forward position we often assume. Camel opens up the entire front body while stretching the shoulders and front of thighs, hip flexors, quads and psoas muscles.

Health.com: Which Type of Yoga is Best for You?

Come in to a kneeling position with your toes tucked under. Place your hands on your lower back and try and slide your tailbone down towards the floor to lengthen your lower back. Lift your chest up and drop your head back as you reach for your heels (if this places any strain on the back keep your hands on your lower back). Hold and breathe for 5 breaths then lift up. If you want to challenge yourself further repeat the pose with the toes flat on the floor. The goal is to open up the chest and stretch the front of the body while lengthening out of the lower back. Use the strong abdominal muscles you found in the first three postures to support the backbend.

Kristin McGee is a leading yoga and Pilates instructor and healthy lifestyle expert based in New York City. She is an ACE certified personal trainer who regularly trains celebrity clients in New York and Los Angeles. She serves as Health's contributing fitness editor and is frequently seen on national TV.

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

New Data Show Faster Job Growth in States With Higher Minimum Wage

Posted: 19 Jul 2014 07:47 AM PDT

New data show that the 13 states that raised the minimum wage this year are adding jobs at a faster pace than those that did not.

State-by-state hiring data released Friday by the Labor Department reveal that in the 13 states that boosted minimum wages at the beginning of this year, the number of jobs grew an average of 0.85 percent from January to June. The average in the other 37 states was 0.61 percent, the Associated Press reports.

The findings could undermine the argument that raising the minimum wage hurts job growth, a view held by major conservative lobbies. The Congressional Budget Office reported earlier this year that a minimum wage of $10.10 could bring 900,000 people out of of poverty, but would cost 500,000 jobs nationwide.

“It raises serious questions about the claims that a raise in the minimum wage is a jobs disaster,” said John Schmitt, a senior economist at the liberal Center for Economic and Policy Research. The job data “isn’t definitive,” he added, but is “probably a reasonable first cut at what’s going on.”

President Barack Obama has supported raising the minimum wage, saying that it will help the economy and businesses.

Some economists said that data was inconclusive and that it’s too early to say whether minimum wage hikes hurt job growth. The rate of job growth was the highest in North Dakota, where the local oil and gas boom has spurred the economy but there has been no minimum wage increase. “It’s too early to tell,” said Stan Veuger, a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. “These states are very different along all kinds of dimensions.”

[AP]

Malaysian Authorities Sharpen Tone on MH17 Attack, Call for Justice

Posted: 19 Jul 2014 07:22 AM PDT

Malaysia has stopped mincing their words. Ismail Nasaruddin, president at Malaysia Airlines staff union NUFAM, said the MH17 attack amounts to "murder," and transport minister Liow Tiong Lai said the world has a "moral obligation" to ensure the safe recovery of remains as well as punishing those culpable. This was the message that came out of Kuala Lumpur on Saturday, after news that pro-Russian rebels have been restricting access to the crash site.

"Malaysia is deeply concerned that the crash site has not been properly secured," said Liow, just ahead of leaving with the second Malaysian team bound for Ukraine to oversee the investigation. "There are indications that vital evidence has not been preserved… [Citizens of 11 nations'] lives were taken by violence; now violence stops them from being accorded their final respect. This cannot continue."

The Ukrainian government has accused the rebels of moving at least 38 bodies from the crash site to a morgue in the rebel stronghold area of Donetsk, according to The New York Times. They also say that rebels have been hiding weaponry, missile fragments and other pieces of evidence. Rebel leaders have denied any interference.

Official Malaysian statements so far have been notably guarded, avoiding calling out an aggressive act as the cause of the crash. But the tone has sharpened considerably since armed separatists hindered a team of international observers from spending more than an hour at the wreckage site on Friday, and further indications pointed at a missile taking the airliner down. At Saturday's press conference, the country’s transport minister also junked claims of any wrongdoings of Malaysia Airlines in connection to the disaster.

"MH17's flight path was a busy major airway, like a highway in the sky. It never strayed into restricted airspace. All sources say that a missile shot it down… this is an outrage that cannot go unpunished." Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, director general of the Department of Civil Aviation answered to a barrage of questions over the decision to fly at 33,000 feet—a mere 1,000 feet above the no-fly zone over the restive Ukrainian region—saying that this was the order the aircraft received from flight control.

Still, worries mount over the conflicted national carrier. Malaysia Airlines' shares plummeted 11% on Friday, on top of an 83% plunge over the last five years. Some believe that the airline may even struggle to survive two such major disasters so close to each other. This is a notion that concerns many Malaysians, who view the company with great patriotism.

"Malaysia Airlines is such a good face for Malaysia to the world," says 23-year-old student Fatin Badjuri, waiting for her flight at Kuala Lumpur International, ranked as one of the region's best airports. "I'm worried about the problems these incidents will cause to the company, as well as to the country. I feel people may start thinking negatively about Malaysia now."

Among the staff at Malaysia Airlines, though, all public concern remains focused on the recent tragedy. The airline released the full list of passengers aboard MH17 Saturday.

"The entire cabin crew population is mourning…we're not really concerned with the financial qualms right now," said Nasaruddin at a separate press conference on Saturday. "The spirit is demoralized. Some have not been able to come to work. The question we ask is if this mass murder was done with the intention to kill everyone on the flight."

Malaysia is craving answers, and fast. Their patience has been sufficiently tried over the past few months.

For Nerds, This Video Is Absolutely Everything

Posted: 19 Jul 2014 07:09 AM PDT

One Star Wars fan is recreating Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope entirely out of stills from Minecraft, the massively popular, low-res video game. The process has already taken three years, with individual scenes taking up to six months to recreate. Naturally, there’s not an official release date yet, though 90 minutes of the film are complete. When it does come out, it will be free to view.

The 3 Most Important Words You Should Learn Right Now

Posted: 19 Jul 2014 07:02 AM PDT

One thing I've learned at Buffer is that being open to not knowing things seems to be the best way to learn quickly and teach others at the same time. So many of our biggest hits on the blog have come from saying, "We don't know the answer. Let's find out!"

On many matters, we haven't any authority.

Is this an OK way to get by?

We've found great success in not knowing, and there's no reason why you can't, too. While we can certainly see the value in establishing yourself as an authority in your industry, being the answer-man or answer-woman isn't the be-all, end-all of your options.

You can survive and thrive by embracing "I don't know."

Here's what we've learned so far.

The leading authorities on not knowing

An interesting phenomenon occurs when you've been not knowing things for as long as we have. You become an authority on not knowing.

That seems to be the case here at the Buffer blog. We'd like nothing more than to be known as a go-to source for social media content. When you think about social media, we'd love for you to think of us!

At the same time, we understand that we may not be authorities on everything social media—we may not have all the answers right away, near at hand.

And that seems to be alright.

Instead of being authorities on social media, we can be authorities on thorough research, fascinating statistics, and personal experience. In other words, there is more than one way to cement yourself in the minds of your followers beyond traditional authority. If we can earn a reputation as a go-to source for social media content by embracing what we don't know, then the opportunity's there for you to do the same.

If you aren't able to claim authority in your chosen field, you can still seek after a subset of authority. You can be an authority on:

Find whatever it is you're good at, and become the best you can be. Soon enough, your Facebook and your Twitter and your blog will be known for the quality, exceptional work you do, regardless of what it is that you don't know.

The authority pyramid

So maybe authority means more than expertise, influence, and confidence. If we expand our definition, we can each find our own path to authority, however it may look.

Impostor syndrome: We all feel like we don't have all the answers

I've had moments where I wasn't sure I was cut out for my job. Have you had these moments, too?

We're not alone. Psychologists call this impostor syndrome, and it applies to those of us who are unable to internalize accomplishments. Despite outward evidence that we're great at what we do, we're convinced that we're frauds and undeserving of our place.

This level of "I Don't Know" is more common than you might think. The term has been around since the 1970s, and researchers believe that up to 70 percent of people have felt the effects of impostor syndrome at some point.

If you're interested in finding out if you have any characteristics of impostor syndrome, you can take the Clance Impostor Scale survey and see where you land. For each statement in the survey, you mark how true it is of you. For example,

  1. I tend to remember the incidents in which I have not done my best more than those times I have done my best.
  2. I often compare my ability to those around me and think they may be more intelligent than I am.
  3. At times, I feel my success has been due to some kind of luck.

Part and parcel of impostor syndrome is the feeling of not knowing—the lack of expertise that we've been talking about so far. Via the Crew blog, here is a simple illustration that shows how impostor syndrome feels:

Impostor Syndrome chart

In the same Crew blog post, Andrea Ayres explains what the manifestations of impostor syndromemight look like, how people may compensate for feeling like a fraud. Do either of these sound familiar to you, whether you've done them yourself or witnessed them from colleagues?

Overdoing: When people prepare to an almost obsessive level, putting in much more effort than is realistically needed in order to ensure they don't fail

Underdoing: People will under prepare or put off doing something until the last minute so they can blame any possible failures on a lack of readiness, as opposed to their actual ability. If you don't really try you can't really fail, right?

Of course, neither of these outcomes is preferable. Overdoing will lead to pressure and burnout; underdoing will lead to poor quality and performance.

With the prevalence of impostor syndrome being as great as it is, there must be a better way to survive and thrive while feeling like you don't have all the answers. Here's one way that we've found.

Giving yourself permission to not know it all

I believe part of the reason for the pressures of impostor syndrome is that there is a stigma around not knowing something. If you feel like an impostor because you don't have all the answers, it's because somewhere along the line you learned that it's best to have all the answers all the time.

Not only is this impossible, it might not even be the best way to go about it.

I'm fortunate to work at a place that embraces the "I don't know." Buffer's values highlight the fact that it's okay to not have all the answers. We phrase this in terms of curiosity, improvement, listening, and humility.

Here are some choice phrases pulled from our Buffer culture slide deck:

You take the approach that everything is a hypothesis and you could be wrong

You approach new ideas thinking, "What can we do right now?"

You are suggestive rather than instructive, replacing phrases such as "certainly" and "undoubtedly" with "perhaps," "I think," and "my intuition right now"

You seek first to understand, then to be understood

Does your company share this belief? I'd be interested to hear which perspective your work takes on the matter of authority and knowledge.

It certainly helps to have an employer so openly embrace the idea of not knowing. And at the same time, there is power in the individual assertion that you don't have to know it all. Even if your company isn't outspoken on the matter, you can change your personal philosophy and give yourself a break from chasing authority. You may find this new mindset refreshing, among the many other benefits of embracing the power of "I don't know."

3 incredible effects of embracing what you don't know

"I don't know" and trust

Jason Freedman of 42 Floors shared a story about a competitive hiring process where one of the key deciding factors for the candidate was Freedman's openness about not knowing an answer. When Freedman said, "I don't know," the candidate was sold. Here's the reason why:

When people say I don't know, it lends credibility to everything else that they've said.

Think about someone who always seems to have an answer for everything. You've maybe wondered along the way if he or she really could know all this stuff, right? But when you admit to not knowing, you give power to the things you do know. People learn to trust your responses to questions and to know they can get an honest answer from you at all times.

"I don't know" and innovation

Stay hungry, stay foolish

This quote from entrepreneur Sahar Hashemi plays off the idea of embracing the power of "I don't know" as it relates to curiosity—a key to innovation. Hashemi believes that being clueless and curious is essential to entrepreneurship. Without it, you no longer dream, tinker, and ask "why not." In this way, knowing too much can actually be a detriment.

"I don't know" and creativity

Would you hire someone with little experience in your industry? Common sense might say no; however, some would argue that inexperience might be just the thing a company needs.

Nils Sk├Âld writes about this idea on Medium, telling how a lack of knowledge can actually be an ideal way to spur creativity and think outside the norms of an industry. Have you experienced anything similar to this?

My theory is this: when you know everything about an industry, you don't know whats good for it. What an industry needs is people who have no idea on how it operates. People that don't know that there are any rules. While it is good to break rules and to push boundaries, it's much better to just never know that any rules exists.

Our key to not knowing: "We don't know the answer. Let's find out!"

In our experience, there's a bit more to the matter of not knowing than simply embracing our lack of knowledge.

We'd be sunk if we stopped at "I don't know." That's why we follow up by finding out.

Much of our blog content comes from experience. We hunt for answers to our questions (and your questions!) and we report back with what we find.

What we lack in authority on social media, we make up for by seeking input from our audience in chats and conversations and by approaching our social updates with a curious, open attitude.

Embracing "I don't know" is an opportunity to discover. We've found that having an attitude of improvement, experimentation, and curiosity makes it such that there's no need to worry about not knowing this or that.

If we don't know, we'll find out.

Over to you: In what ways has not knowing benefited you?

Having authority in your industry is great, but it isn't the be-all, end-all for growth. You can enjoy authority in many number of different ways from being the expert of experts to being the expert of your unique perspective.

We've embraced the power of "I don't know," and we've seen the benefits for trust, innovation, creativity, discovery, and so much more.

If you liked this post, you might also like The Beginner's Guide to Putting the Internet to Work for You: How to Easily Save 60 Minutes Every Day and The Big List of IFTTT Recipes: 34 Hacks for Hardcore Social Media Productivity.

Kevan is a content crafter at Buffer, the super simple social media management tool. His social media and productivity tips have appeared in Fast Company and Lifehacker, and he's always on the lookout for a good headline pun. Connect with him on Twitter .

7 Amazing Pieces of Advice No One Ever Gave You

Posted: 19 Jul 2014 06:55 AM PDT


This post is in partnership with Inc., which offers useful advice, resources and insights to entrepreneurs and business owners. The article below was originally published at Inc.com.

Career advice is in no short supply. In fact, you could probably spend the duration of your working life simply reading through the tips and advice already online. But as in all areas of life, the more common something is, generally speaking, the lower its value.

Many oft repeated truisms are more about wish fulfillment than reality (sorry peddlers of endless, uncritical “follow your passion!” posts). Plus, tips that everyone and their mother (and their college career counselor) knows are unlikely to give you an edge over the competition. So what are the true hidden gems of career advice, the truths that few people are willing to say out loud that can actually transform a mediocre career into a rockstar one?

That’s what a someone on question-and-answer site Quora wanted to know recently, asking: “What are a few unique pieces of career advice that nobody ever mentions?” The community responded with plenty of uncommon, thought-provoking advice.

1. Doing your job well is not enough.

Being excellent at your job is a surefire way to get ahead, right? Nope, say several responders, including Victor Wong, CEO of PaperG. “Most people assume just doing their current assigned job well is enough–so many associates at law firms think doing all the paperwork and litigation properly is the road to partnership, and many PR account executives think that getting a few articles written about their clients will earn them a promotion,” he writes, but “becoming a principal, partner, or senior executive with P&L-level responsibility requires a completely separate set of skills from entry and mid-level jobs.”

How do you make that leap? “To make the big jump to the next level, they’re really being benchmarked on their ability to deliver future value to the firm in ways that are not taught or explained to them: chiefly how much business are they are able to bring in,” he asserts. “People who can think of what to do and deliver are the ones who ultimately are more likely to get promoted to the top levels.”

Another anonymous poster agrees: “You don’t become a star doing your job. You become a star making things happen.”

2. Who you work for is hugely important.

We all wish we lived in a world where who you know matters less than what you can do, but that’s often not reality, and not always for unhealthy reasons. Knowing the best in the business often means you’ve worked with the best, and people rightly admire that.

“You don’t have to be passionate about the product you are selling. You don’t have to be in the most glamorous industry. You don’t have to work for the company with the best ‘brand’ identity or reputation in your chosen field,” insists Jeremy Boudinet, director of marketing for startup Ambition. What does matter is who you’ve worked with.

“Few things are as valuable as going and working for somebody that is going to want to teach you anything and everything they know. You’ll experience tremendous personal and professional growth if you have the best person mentoring you,” he says, so “figure out where the absolute best person to work for would be, and go work for them.”

3. … So is where you work.

Just like who you work for can deeply affect the fate of your career, where you work also has a massive impact. Just saying, ‘I want to work in software or sales,’ isn’t enough. Nor, as Boudinet point out, is it enough just to fill your resume with impressive company names. Your destiny is influenced greatly by the destiny of the particular organization that employs you. Don’t take a job with just any old company because it’s in the right sector or impresses your friends.

“Your career is a boat and it is at the mercy of tides. No matter how talented you are it’s a lot harder to break out in a sluggish situation/hierarchy/economy than a go-go environment. Even if you’re a superstar at Sluggish Co., your upside trajectory (more often than not) is fractional to what an average/below average employee achieves at Rocket Ship Co,” says an anonymous poster with the most up-voted answer.

4. Being seen as super busy isn’t always a good thing.

Think high achievers work endless hours and are continuously busy? Think again, writes Mira Zaslove, director of international sales and trading at FabExchange. “Ironically the busier you appear, often the less you will move up. I’ve seen smart and dedicated employees fail to get promoted, because they have taken on too much, are working too hard, and appeared too frazzled,” she reports. “If you appear stressed, people will think you aren’t prepared to take on more, and you’ll miss opportunities for new and innovative projects.”

5. Take a tour.

When plotting your first (or next) big career move, many of us think very abstractly, musing in solitude or in front of Google about the joys of our supposed dream jobs. But the truth is you can’t decide on a career without seeing the day-to-day reality of where and how you work–the concrete truth rather than the imagined reality. Don’t make decisions without actually going and seeing for yourself.

Alek Mirkovich, founder of campayn.com, once thought becoming an air traffic controller was a great idea, but then he took a tour of where he would actually be working. “Every single guy was BALD! Playing around with a simulator is fun, but apparently the real thing is stressful. Within 30 seconds I knew I wasn’t going to be signing up for this!” he remembers.

6. Don’t hide your failures.

Failures are seen less as a signal of incompetence and more as a sign that you’re willing to take a risk and innovate, according to Zaslove. “Your team will respect you and your career will accelerate if people understand what you are doing and that you are taking risks. Most people do not view someone as credible if they are giving advice and recommendations, but not walking the walk,” she claims. “If you show that you are willing to take risks, and publicly falter, your team will feel confident taking risks too. Lead by example.”

7. Execution matters more than plans or advice.

Many people are looking for the magic recipe of how to make their career take off, but many of the responders agree that there are some serious limits to what other people can tell you. “Advice (like ideas) is not in short supply, there is plenty of it going around,” writes coach Darren Beattie, for instance. “It’s not really the advice in the long run that matters, it’s the execution of the advice by the person being advised. The greatest advice ever in the history of the human race is absolutely useless if you act/execute on none of it.”

Or to put it another way, there’s no real roadmap that you can blindly follow. The trick is figuring out what to apply and what to ignore for your own personal situation. That same popular anonymous responder sums this idea up well: “Career tracks and meritocracies don’t exist: Your career is not a linear, clearly defined trajectory.”

What less well known bit of career wisdom would you add to this list?

Read more from Inc.com:

The Psychological Price of Entrepreneurship

14 Tactics for Reading People's Body Language

The One Trait That Guarantees a Good Hire

7 Things You Can Do on Friday to Make Monday Awesome

Sheryl Sandberg and the Hypocrisy of Lean In

These Are the Companies With the Worst Customer Service

Posted: 19 Jul 2014 06:47 AM PDT

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This post is in partnership with 24/7 Wall Street. The article below was originally published on 247wallst.com.

By , , , and

When it comes to companies we dread dealing with, we all know who they are. Let's put it this way, would you rather go to the Apple Genius Bar to fix something with your iPhone or to the Bank of America teller to reverse a surprise interest charge?

It's perhaps no wonder Bank of America leads the nation in bad customer service. The massive U.S. financial institution has made the Customer Service Hall of Shame every year since 2009.

In collaboration with research survey group Zogby Analytics, we polled 2,500 adults about the quality of customer service at 150 of America's best-known companies in 15 industries, asking if that service was "excellent," "good," "fair" or "poor."

Those with the highest percentages of "excellent" rankings make up the Customer Service Hall of Fame; those with the highest share "poor" ratings make up our Customer Service Hall of Shame. (See how the survey was done and full results on the last page of this article.)

MORE: Ten States with the Slowest Growing Economies

Many of the other companies with the bottom-rated customer service have earned spots on the Hall of Shame list in the past. Eight of the 10 companies in the Hall of Shame have made at least three previous appearances since 2009.

It is difficult for businesses in some industries to win consumer praise. Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Citigroup — three of the largest banks in the country — received some of the worst customer service ratings in the nation.

For banks, the many fees they charge may contribute to a customer's poor evaluation of a company. "As soon as you take out your Bank of America ATM card you get charged," said Praveen Kopalle, professor of marketing at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College.

In addition to unpleasant and repeated charges and fees, these large banks engaged in questionable and often unlawful behavior that contributed to the housing crisis. For example, "[Banks] assured customers that [mortgage-backed securities] were actually good products when, in fact, they were pretty toxic," Kopalle said.

Cable and satellite TV companies are another segment that has repeatedly received poor customer service ratings. Shep Hyken, a customer satisfaction expert, explained that these companies are often unclear about their service charges. "Customers get shocked when they get their bill," Hyken said.

In some instances, companies have little incentive to offer good service. "If people really don't like the customer service that they receive from telecom companies, they don't have a lot of choice," Tim Calkins, clinical professor of marketing at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, explained. Without competition from other companies, "there is just not that pressure to deliver great service."

Future consolidation in these industries may exacerbate the problem. Companies like AT&T and DirecTV, as well as Time Warner Cable and Comcast, are driving merger and acquisition activity that will likely close this year, pending government approval.

Many of the companies with the worst customer service, however, are still market leaders and manage to maintain impressive profit margins. Seven of the 10 companies in the Hall of Shame dominate their industries.

This is 24/7 Wall St.'s Customer Service Hall of Shame:

MORE: Ten States with the Fastest Growing Economies

10. Citigroup
> Pct. ratings "poor": 15.3% (credit card), 15.1% (banking)

More than 15% of respondents said they had a "poor" experience with both Citigroup Inc.'s (NYSE: C) credit card and banking businesses.

However, Citigroup is hardly alone among financial institutions in receiving low ratings for its customer service. Both Bank of America and Wells Fargo had worse-rated banking operations. While missing from the bottom 10, Capital One and J.P. Morgan Chase also received low ratings.

The banking industry as a whole suffers from bad press, likely due to its involvement in the financial crisis. According to analyst Dick Bove, penalties, regulations and rule changes have made quality customer service even more difficult to deliver.

"The banks responded by taking away millions of credit cards from customers that they could no longer do business with on a profitable basis," Bove said.

While customers gave Citi's credit card and banking service low grades, the bank performed well overall in the Pew Charitable Trusts' most recent annual survey on consumer banking practices. Citi's policies include five of the seven "best practices" endorsed by the study.

MORE: The 15 Highest-Paying Companies in America

9. Wells Fargo
> Pct. ratings "poor": 16.2% (credit card), 15.0% (banking)

More than 16% of survey participants said their experience with Wells Fargo's credit card business was "poor." Wells Fargo's banking operations did not fare much better for customer service. About 15% reported a "poor" customer service experience for Well Fargo as a bank.

The company declined an interview. In written statement, it said that it was committed to improving customer experience, and that it was "always looking for ways to apply their input and further strengthen our customer service."

Although Wells Fargo & Co. (NYSE: WFC) has largely avoided the financial crisis-related fines several of its competitors paid, it has not been immune to scrutiny. The bank, which is the largest provider of home loans, was sued by the Federal Housing Authority in 2012 for bad mortgages. Like other banks, continuous criticism since the financial crisis is likely a major component of Wells Fargo's customer dissatisfaction.

According to Bove, bad press is only part of the problem. Strict regulations and large fines can have a considerable impact on customer relations as banks are forced to implement cost-cutting measures that may inconvenience consumers.

8. AT&T
> Pct. ratings "poor": 17.5%

AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) is hardly the only mobile telephone company that received a disproportionate number of negative reviews for its customer service. In fact, all four of the nation's leading mobile carriers were among the bottom fifth of companies evaluated.

Although the company's record of customer service is spotty, AT&T has developed several initiatives designed to improve customer outreach. Among these, the company wrote in its annual report that it had 70 staffers dedicated to customer care on social media platforms. Additionally, last year AT&T streamlined its call center menus, cut waiting times, and trained specialized employees to handle smartphone operating system-related questions.

"Three or four years ago, the customer service at AT&T was very poor, but they really have come a long way," Kopalle said. Now, "They pick up the phone pretty fast, they resolve your situation very quickly." However, Kopalle noted that AT&T's service is hardly perfect. "I think they still suffer from a number of dropped calls. That's not really a good thing."

For the rest of the list, go to 24/7 Wall St.

 

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