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Thursday, July 24, 2014

Ray Rice Suspended For 2 Games Over Assault Charge

Ray Rice Suspended For 2 Games Over Assault Charge


Ray Rice Suspended For 2 Games Over Assault Charge

Posted: 24 Jul 2014 11:05 AM PDT

The National Football League confirmed Thursday that the Baltimore Ravens’ Ray Rice has been suspended for two games without pay and given a $58,000 fine after a grand jury indicted Rice with assaulting a woman he later married.

“As you acknowledged during our meeting, your conduct was unquestionably inconsistent with league polices and the standard of behavior required of everyone who is part of the NFL,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell wrote to Rice in a letter following a meeting between the two men.

Rice pled not guilty to aggravated assault in the third degree after a physical altercation between him and then-fiancee Janay Palmer left Palmer unconscious in an Atlantic City casino elevator. A grand jury indicted Rice in March; Rice and Palmer married the following day. Rice settled those charges by entering a pretrial program in May, which meant he was not required to pay a criminal fine or serve jail time. The indictment will be cleared from Rice’s record in one year.

However, the NFL says Rice violated the league’s personal conduct policy, opening him up to punishment by the league.

The running back’s suspension from play will begin on Aug. 30, and he will be eligible to play again on Sept. 12. He will not be paid for those two games plus an additional game, a loss that totals in more than $470,000. He is permitted to participate in training camp and preseason games. The three-time Pro Bowl player can appeal the decision within three days.

Goodell went on to say that Rice was expected to continue counseling.

“It is disappointing that I will not be with my teammates for the first two games of the season, but that’s my fault,” Rice said in a statement released by the team. “As I said earlier, I failed in many ways. But, Janay and I have learned from this. We have become better as a couple and as parents.”

“We also respect the efforts Ray has made to become the best partner and father he can be,” General Manager and Executive Vice President Ozzie Newsome said in a statement. “That night was not typical of the Ray Rice we know and respect. We believe that he will not let that one night define who he is, and he is determined to make sure something like this never happens again.”

Armed Forces Push Residents Out of ‘World’s Tallest Slum’

Posted: 24 Jul 2014 11:04 AM PDT

On Tuesday, Venezuelan armed forces began the process of forcing out residents at the Tower of David, the nation’s tallest slum, the government’s “Great Housing Mission.”

The 45-story building, originally built to be a high-rise bank, was never completed and abandoned, then taken over by people in need of shelter.

Prior to the start of the evacuation, the slum acted as home to over 3,000 squatters, many of whom have resisted their removal. The building is also home to businesses including a beauty salon, multiple bodegas, and an unlicensed dentist.

Fear of Flying: Don’t Be Fooled By the Scary News—Air Travel Is as Safe as Ever

Posted: 24 Jul 2014 10:59 AM PDT

The news from the skies couldn’t get grimmer. In just the week since Malaysian Airlines flight 17 was brought down by a missile strike in Ukraine, killing 298 people, two more planes have gone down or gone missing: On July 23, a TransAsia flight crashed off Taiwan, killing 58 people, probably due to turbulence caused by typhoon Matmo; this morning an Air Algerie plane with 116 people aboard disappeared from radar and is thought to have crashed off of Mali, another possible victim of weather. And all of this comes in the wake of the still-mysterious March 8 disappearance of Malaysian Air flight 370, with 239 people aboard.

If you’re like most people, the temptation is to swear off air travel, at least for a while. And, like most people, you’ve reached the wrong conclusion.

Human beings are very good at a lot of things, but we’re terrible when it comes to risk assessment. That’s not our fault; we’re wired that way. If the tiger comes from one patch of the forest, you avoid that patch. If snakes are in one fruit tree you never return to it. But the modern world presents a whole lot more complexity than our still slowly developing brains are equipped to handle. And few things flummox us more than airplanes.

Start with the fact that we can’t wrap our brains around how they work in the first place. Yes, there are engines and lift and flaps and who-knows what all keeping them up. But the fact is, a fully loaded 747 weighs 975,000 lbs and attains a top speed of 570 mph at altitudes exceeding 6.5 mi. That kind of machine just shouldn’t work and so we always half-assume it won’t.

There is, too, the much discussed helplessness attendant to buckling yourself into an airline seat, obeying all the rules about seat backs and tray tables and turning off electronic equipment and when you can jolly well get up to go to the bathroom. When you’re behind the wheel, you feel like you’re in control. When an anonymous pilot is at the stick, you feel like little more than cargo.

The occasional rash of disasters like the recent ones don’t help matters any. But the fact is, those are just statistical clusters — the airline equivalent of a few people in one country developing a rare form of cancer, which gets people looking for an environmental toxin or some other cause, when in fact it may just be random numbers at play. Yes, flying into a war zone or the teeth of a typhoon is going to increase the danger that something very bad is going to happen to you. But avoid those obvious no-go zones and the odds are very good you’ll be just fine.

In 2010, according to a report by the U.N.’s Civil Aviation Organization, there were a breathtaking 30,566,513 commercial departures worldwide. Yet, according to an authoritative site that tracks all departures and arrivals, there were only 12 crashes of planes carrying more than 18 people and only three of them resulted in more than 99 fatalities. Those deaths were an unspeakable tragedy for the people who lost their lives and the families they left behind, but in the cold calculus of probability, they’re less than a rounding error compared to all the people who flew aboard those 30.5 million flights.

Despite such low individual odds, one thing that scares us off of airplanes is the unavoidably uneven distribution of the crashes that do occur. So the 35 commercial accidents in 1968 and 1969, the 34 in 1972 and 1973, and the 33 in 1989, would have likely had a lot of people reaching for their car keys and hitting the roads instead. And it’s worse when one of the crashes is especially notorious — such as the Dec. 1988 bombing of Pan Am 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, which directly preceded 1989′s string of comparatively bad luck.

The Sept. 11 attacks, of course, are the darkest example of all. The two flights that brought down the World Trade Towers alone top the list of the world’s worst air disasters, with the 2,907 deaths easily outdistancing the two-plane runway accident that claimed 583 lives on Tenerife in the Canary Islands in 1977.

Air travel suffered badly in the wake of Sept. 11, but so, it turned out, did some of the people who avoided the planes. From October to December 2001 there were 1,000 more highway fatalities than there had been in that same period the year before — the simple result of more people being on the road. “It was called the 9/11 effect,” David Ropeik, an independent risk consultant and a former professor of the Harvard School of Public Health, told me for my 2007 book Simplexity. Nearly 3,000 people died as a direct result of the attacks and a third again as an indirect one.

Air travel, surely, is not risk free, but it’s hardly a new observation to say that nothing is. Statistical clusters do smooth out over even a relatively short period of time and what feels like a grave danger today will seem relatively benign again tomorrow. The tragedy of the lives lost on the recent crashes is a very real thing; but so is the low likelihood of any one person suffering the same sorrowful end.

Chris Christie Battered By His GOP Rivals on Governors’ Circuit

Posted: 24 Jul 2014 10:53 AM PDT

Forget, for the moment, about the cornfields and the straw polls, the live-free-or-die gun shops of Manchester and the sticky-sweet BBQ pits of South Carolina. There is a point in the 2016 presidential campaign, when the action that matters most is more likely to happen under gilded ceilings of Manhattan's toniest restaurants than where voters actually live. Which is why New Jersey Governor Chris Christie found himself supping at Cipriani on May 18, seated between the billionaire who might fund his way to the White House and a rival governor who wants the job himself. It was a test meal, in its way, and Christie fumbled it.

Organizers had told the press to attend to hear Christie give a muscular address on his foreign policy vision. But the real audience was his table-mate, Sheldon Adelson, the Casino mogul who dumped more than $100 million to elect Republicans in 2012 and was promising even more. Just weeks earlier, Christie had flown to Vegas with three other current and former Republican governors to meet with Adelson at his Venetian casino under the banner of the Republican Jewish Coalition. There Christie had botched his message, speaking of Israel's "occupied territories," a term that the Zionist Adelson does not favor. Christie later apologized during his few private minutes with the GOP kingmaker. Now he was back for what organizers called a "Major Speech on Israel and the Middle East.” And something went wrong again. He didn't mention Israel once in his 18-minute address. In the midst of a political rehabilitation tour, his tablemate Texas Gov. Rick Perry saw a clear opportunity. When he rose to speak minutes later, Perry shoehorned three references to Israel within 90 seconds.

As the head of the Republican Governors Association, Christie is the charismatic captain of a club composed of formal partners but tacit rivals. And that rivalry has only gotten stronger in recent months. Despite surface-level niceties and some degree of symbiotic friendship, many want to see him and his presidential ambitions go up in flames. On Thursday, the tensions broke into view as Republican state leaders broke with Christie, who has refused to publicly appear with Rob Astorino, a long-shot candidates hoping to replace Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo. “Glad to be with my buddy @RobAstorino in Aspen,” tweeted Perry, a few days after Christie told reporters he did not believe that the Republican Astorino had a chance of winning. Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker have all since expressed support for Astorino.

This follows several other thinly veiled slights in recent months. Just last week Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal implicitly criticized Christie's habit of picking and choosing issues to engage on, saying the GOP must offer ideas not style. "The next big elections can't be ones about personalities or just about slogans," he told TIME, after a question about Christie. After Christie became ensnarled in a scandal over lane closures on the George Washington Bridge, Jindal had told reporters, “No one governor’s more important than the other." In February, Scott Walker used Christie's scandal to sidestep questions about an investigation into improper political activities by his former aides. "He addressed it early on, but obviously he's not out of the woods yet," Walker told TIME, saying unlike his, Christie's troubles were "just beginning." And when Christie was nearly down-for-the-count in the immediate aftermath of the bridge scandal, Perry fanned the flames. "Is a conservative in New Jersey a conservative in the rest of the country?" Perry asked in February on ABC's This Week.

As the Republican Party looks to its governors for leadership after years of chaos and infighting in Washington, Christie is no longer a cut above the rest, even as he travels the country as the official leader of Republican governors. Christie is routinely on the road meeting donors and reporters, and by the nature of the job working to defend the 20 Republican-held governorships up for re-election this year. Christie allies said the group was close, despite occasional disagreements. "First and foremost, they're friends, so they want to be able to help each other," says RGA Executive Director Phil Cox. Like any club, behind the pretense there are tense personal relationships, but the stakes are unusually high. Perry, Walker, and Jindal are just some of the governors competing in 2016's proto-primary alongside John Kasich of Ohio, and Mike Pence of Indiana.

The Jindal-Christie relationship is the most fraught, stemming from a bitter leadership battle for the high-profile helm of the RGA in 2012. Christie won out that fight, securing enough votes to force Jindal to accept the number two spot. And with Perry, Christie’s conversations frequently could not be described as civil, people familiar with the exchanges said. With Christie's fortunes soured, his opponents hurriedly planned trips to New York to meet with the donor class he once seemed to have a lock on. Jindal and Perry have been there as much as twice a month since the beginning of the year, while Walker has made at least four trips as he raises money for his own re-election. Meanwhile, top donors are once again clamoring for former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush to enter the race.

"It's like your fiancé cheated on you," said a person close to one of the ambitious governors, explaining why no other governor has yet emerged as a new favorite. "You don't propose to the next girl you meet. You take your time to have some fun and meet everyone else." Meanwhile many of the governors Christie is working to re-elect have tried to place some distance between themselves and Christie, with fewer joint events open to reporters. The calls from New York financiers for Christie to run have become less frequent as they take stock of the field. Christie's core argument to his party and Wall Street has been his electability, and he is still struggling to show he can win despite the setbacks. More importantly to donors, the question is whether he has learned from the experience. "He's still surrounded by the same guys," said one top Republican bundler who was previously committed to Christie. "Where's the growth? I'm not seeing it yet."

But it is Christie's economic record that is emerging as a concrete boot to his likely campaign. His state's finances are in shambles, with Christie forced to rollback a signature effort to begin paying down the state's skyrocketing unfunded pension liabilities after overestimating state revenues by nearly $1 billion for each of the next two years. Christie's state lags most of his GOP colleagues on annual rankings of the best state to do business, while its unemployment rate puts New Jersey in the bottom third of states. Where Christie talks up the successes of all GOP governors, Perry and Jindal travel the country referring to the governors as "competitors" for jobs, not-so-subtly highlighting their states' relative successes.

The bridge scandal has also revealed the insularity of Christie's team, centered around strategist Mike DuHaime and former law partner and political fixer Bill Palatucci. The former Giuliani for President campaign manager and Republican National Committee member, are the hard-charging pair behind the harder-charging would-be-candidate. Todd Christie, the governor's brother, rounds out the inner circle that once included Bill Stepien, his former campaign manager who was poised to take on a role with the RGA and was forced to resign in the wake of his involvement in the bridge scandal.

Where Jindal, Perry and Walker all maintain national donor lists thanks to political action committees, Christie's political network is largely confined to New Jersey. "He'll start out at a disadvantage," said on GOP digital operative familiar with the potential candidates' operations.

At the Law Vegas gathering of Republican Jewish donors in March, Scott Walker tried to steal some of Chris Christie's thunder. He sonorously told of lighting a "menorah candle" around Hanukah and that his son Matthew's name is derived from the Hebrew for 'Gift from God.' Walker sidestepped his lack of foreign policy experience by telling of Ronald Reagan's showdown with air traffic controllers that "sent a message around the world," and highlighted his ability to win over Latino voters around Milwaukee. Each of these anecdotes were staples of Christie's now-familiar pitch to donors and party activists.

Thankfully for Christie, he's still more dynamic speaker. Following 45 minutes after Walker, Christie told the same stories—but this time, the crowd was brought to their feet for applause.

Correction: Organizers of the event characterized the address as a “Major Speech on Israel and the Middle East.”

Watching TV to Relieve Stress Can Make You Feel Like a Failure

Posted: 24 Jul 2014 10:51 AM PDT

It’s almost a reflex — after a tough day, you turn on the TV, or binge-watch your favorite show on Netflix. Getting lost in other people’s troubles, or laughing your way through a sitcom, is a good way to forgot your own worries, right? Turns out that people who rely on TV or video games to relax actually end up feeling like failures afterwards.

Some research has shown that using media can make you more relaxed, since it provides a momentary escape from whatever stresses are eating away at us, but researchers found that particularly busy and fatigued people actually felt guilty about spending so much time in front of the TV. In their study, published in the Journal of Communication, the scientists surveyed 471 people about their previous day, how they felt after work, and what media they turned to at the end of the day.

People who felt especially wiped out saw their media time as a form of procrastination, and felt they were avoiding other important things on their to-do lists. These participants were likely to describe “giving in” to media use, and that feeling prevented them from benefiting from the down time and relaxing. “We are starting to look at media use as a cause of depletion. In times of smartphones and mobile Internet, the ubiquitous availability of content and communication often seems to be a burden and a stressor rather than a recovery resource,” study author Leonard Reinecke of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany said in a statement.

It seems, however, that the content of what people watch on TV can alleviate some of this guilty pleasure perception. Other studies have shown that intellectually stimulating media content (like a History Channel segment or a documentary) can positively impact people’s emotional states, so the study authors believe that watching “low-brow” forms of entertainment (we’re guessing reality TV qualifies here) are more likely to make people feel guilty about using it as a stress-reliever.

The researchers acknowledge that their test set-up can’t prove that watching TV will make you feel worse about yourself; there are certainly other variables that could impact how people feel about their media consumption. If people weren’t satisfied with what they watched, for example, they might have been more likely to feel it was a waste of their time and not as stress-relieving as it could have been. If TV seems too hit-or-miss, there’s always exercise and meditation to help you forget your day.

Watch: Kristen Bell Plays a Minimum-Wage Mary Poppins

Posted: 24 Jul 2014 10:50 AM PDT

In case you had any doubts about whether Kristen Bell is one of Hollywood’s most talented dames, check out this amazing Funny or Die video in which she plays a fed-up Mary Poppins who quits her job because her pay sucks. The best part is when she looks in the mirror and her reflection is a Republican. Also props to Funny or Die for finding the perfect kids to play Jane and Michael Banks.

Babysitters of the world, unite!

Here’s How Facebook Doubled Its IPO Price

Posted: 24 Jul 2014 10:42 AM PDT

Facebook suffered a cruel summer back in 2012. The social network raised its IPO price just before going public in May 2012, but technical glitches during early trading caused mass investor confusion. Nasdaq eventually paid a $10 million fine over the debacle, and Wall Street showed no mercy to the social network in the ensuing months. Facebook's stock cratered, diving from $38 to below $18 before the following autumn.

Two years later, the sun's shining bright on the tech giant. Facebook beat analysts’ expectations yet again in its latest quarterly earnings report, generating revenue of $2.9 billion and earnings per share of 42 cents. That sent the company's stock soaring above $76 during midday trading Thursday, doubling its IPO price of $38. That's also more than quadruple the social network's all-time low close of $17.73.

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Facebook's massive turnaround has everything to do with mobile. When the company went public, its revenue was almost completely tied to desktop ads–exactly the kind of business investors in the mobile era don't like. With more than half a billion people already accessing Facebook on mobile, the company had to prove that it could successfully transition its business. CEO Mark Zuckerberg set a laser-like focus on mobile strategy, and he forced his executive clique to do the same.

The dedication has paid off. Facebook now generates more than two-thirds of its total ad revenue on mobile and has more than a billion mobile monthly active users. Overall ad prices jumped 123 percent year-over-year, partially because mobile ads placed directly in users' News Feeds are more valuable than ads on the right rail of the site served to desktop users.

But what really has Wall Street salivating is the fact that Facebook has plenty of mobile monetization moves left to make. New auto-playing video ads in users' News Feeds could help the company lure marketers from television. Instagram introduced ads last year that are being positioned as an attractive option for brand marketers. The company is also likely to figure out ways to make money off its messaging goliaths Messenger and recently-acquired WhatsApp.

Overall, it's clear that Facebook has solved its mobile conundrum, and Wall Street is rewarding it handsomely. With its share of the overall mobile advertising market quickly increasing, the company may soon to be able to challenge Google to be at the top of the totem pole of mobile.

Weird Al: Pop’s Last King

Posted: 24 Jul 2014 10:38 AM PDT

When Michael Jackson died, people mourned the death of a giant but they also mourned the death of the cultural consensus he represented. They mourned the passing of a figure so huge and so central to pop culture that seemingly everyone knew him, no matter where they fell in the cultural divide. In that respect, I suspect that part of the tidal wave of excitement greeting the release of Mandatory Fun, the ecstatically received new album from preeminent Michael Jackson parodist "Weird Al" Yankovic, comes from the re-emergence of a figure whose popularity transcends cultural and generational boundaries, who can truly be said to be a household name. The album charted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 in its first week, a first for the artist.

The mainstream that Jackson personified doesn't seem to exist anymore. The pop culture world has fractured too violently into too many different warring factions for the center to hold. If a mainstream exists at all anymore, it can be pieced together, makeshift, from the base components of an album like Mandatory Fun. The album cements Yankovic's status as an invaluable uniter in a wildly divisive music world.

Yankovic's music unites his older fans with their past, with the MTV or radio-obsessed kids they used to be and the central role he played in their musical education. But it goes beyond that; Yankovic's polka medleys are a brilliant microcosm for his take on pop music. Mandatory Fun's obligatory polka medley, "NOW That's What I Call Polka," is essentially Girl Talk for the middle-aged and out of date, a high-energy mash-up of seemingly every inescapable single of the past three years.

One of the overlooked benefits of growing older is the freedom from having to follow pop music closely, from feeling obligated to have an opinion on every important new act or flash in the pan. Part of the brilliance of Yankovic's albums is that he follows pop music and the rampaging idiocies of the pop chart so that his often middle-aged fans don't have to, content that dear old Uncle Al will translate the ephemeral ditties and one-hit wonders of the day into language they understand, the musical vocabulary of the genially wacky spoof.

Mandatory Fun might just be the ideal way to experience contemporary pop music. It offers the catchiness of "Blurred Lines" without the rapey gender politics, leering sexism and Robin Thicke's pervy personality; Miley Cyrus without the twerking and lascivious tongue wraggling; and LMFAO without, well, everything that makes them obnoxious, which is everything.

Yankovic famously released eight videos from the album in eight consecutive days, including the zeitgeist-capturing smashes "Tacky" and "Word Crimes." It's a strategy that allowed the savvy and prescient Yankovic to leverage his connections with Internet dynamos like Nerdist, Funny Or Die and College Humor (needless to say, at least some of those kids who grew up worshiping Al ended up in positions of power inside corporate suites), who helped produce the videos and publicized the album, while highlighting the broad-based appeal of an album that includes not only relatively timely hits of smashes from the likes of Lorde, Imagine Dragons, Iggy Azalea and Pharell, but also brazenly untimely homages to Southern Culture On The Skids, The Pixies, Cat Stevens and both a polka and Yankovic's first-ever March ("Sports Song").

The every-song-a-single approach is particularly savvy given the central role singles play in the pop landscape. People aren't buying albums the way they did before; Robin Thicke's new album Paula, for example, is flopping while the infectious beat for his signature song is doing great things for a man who is impishly using it to play grammar bully to a delighted populace.

YouTube was to supposed to maim, if not destroy, Yankovic's career by flooding the site with a slew of younger, hungrier and lewder parodists who didn't need a major label to put out parodies, just a video camera and some goofy new lyrics to a familiar song. Yet in 2014, the parody market is still "Weird Al" Yankovic, followed distantly by everyone else. Considering the ways the industry has changed over the past 10 years, it's remarkable how little progress everyone else has made. Nostalgia undoubtedly plays a role; the release of a new "Weird Al" album can't help but inspire wistful memories of long-ago days watching Al goof his way through videos spoofing Madonna, Nirvana, Kurt Cobain and countless other giants who are either gone or irrevocably changed, whereas Al never seems to age.

For all of the changes in the industry, and outside it, a "Weird Al" Yankovic parody of a hit song still feels official and important in a way no other spoof does. For all the pretenders on the Internet, when it comes to parodies, it sure seems like folks still want the 54-year-old they grew up with and still represents the gold standard for funny music.

Pop music parodies occupy one of the smallest, least respected ghettos in pop music. Yankovic has never been one to think small, however, and from the very beginning his domain has been all of popular music, not just the tiny little subsection devoted to his particular specialty. That mindset is paying enormous dividends right now. It is a halcyon moment for an inveterate uniter with a view of pop expansive enough to fit the totality of recorded music snugly inside one of his fat suits.

Nathan Rabin is a staff writer for The Dissolve and the author of Weird Al: The Book (with "Weird Al" Yankovic) and You Don't Know Me But You Don't Like Me.

Apple’s OS X Yosemite Beta Is Rolling Out Now, but Be Aware of These Issues

Posted: 24 Jul 2014 10:31 AM PDT

As promised, Apple has started rolling out a public beta version of its forthcoming OS X Yosemite operating system for Mac computers and laptops. The beta build, listed by Apple as 14A299l, is a tick higher in enumeration than the fourth developer preview released on Monday, though it’s not clear whether there’s a meaningful difference between the versions or simply a designative one.

The beta build will go out to one million program participants in the form of a code, downloadable through the Mac App Store. Beta members can retrieve their code by logging into the beta website and following the instructions. Apple says you’ll need to be running OS X Mavericks 10.9 or later, have at least 2GB of memory and at least 8GB of free disk space.

Don’t expect to receive updates as frequently as developers, says Apple, but you’ll be able to upgrade to the final version whenever it’s released (sometime this fall) seamlessly.

Before you dive in, be aware that some of Yosemite’s iOS 8-related features won’t be available in the beta (until you have iOS 8, which won’t be out until this fall, and which is only available now in beta through Apple’s developer program). It’s also worth scanning through the following issues Apple’s listed as present in the initial public beta to determine if they’re deal-breakers for you:

  • Safari may hang when playing certain Netflix content.
  • iPhoto 9.5.1 and Aperture 3.5.1 are required on OS X Yosemite. Update to these versions from the Mac App Store.
  • When entering edit mode in iPhoto, a black screen may be displayed instead of the selected photo.
  • Photo Stream and iCloud Photo Sharing may not function properly when both iPhoto and Aperture are installed.
  • The shared purchase history page on the Mac App Store is disabled for Family Sharing accounts.
  • iCloud Drive may appear empty in the Finder after first time setup. Restart to resolve this problem.
  • AirDrop may not show nearby Macs.
  • Sending files to another Mac using AirDrop may not work.

Tina Fey and Rachel Dratch’s Second City Show Dratch & Fey Is Now Online

Posted: 24 Jul 2014 10:29 AM PDT

It’s hard to recall a time when Tina Fey wasn’t filling our TV sets and movie screens with big laughs, but back in 1999, before Saturday Night Live made her a household name and Mean Girls was the stuff of legend and 30 Rock GIFs filled Facebook, Fey was just another comic trying to make a name for herself in the comedy trenches.

Thanks to the magical elves that post videos to YouTube, fans can travel back in time to witness the wonder of a two-woman show called Dratch & Fey, starring Fey and fellow SNL-er Rachel Dratch. The show ran at both Second City and New York’s UCB Theater from 1999-2000, when both women were on the cusp of stardom. Dratch had joined the cast of SNL and Fey had recently been appointed as the head writer of the show, but had not yet moved in front of the camera.

The show itself, much like SNL, was a series of sketches woven together by nothing more than humor. In the clip posted to YouTube, the duo starts by riffing on “theater as social tool” with Dratch becoming Edwina Garth Burnham, a woman's rights pioneer, while Fey adopts the personality of a modern woman exploring her sexuality. Naturally, big laughs ensue.

The quality of the video isn’t great, as it appears to have been ripped from a VHS tape, but when you get nearly an hour of vintage Dratch and Fey given free rein on stage, you don’t look a YouTube gift horse in the mouth. You just watch.

(via Splitsider)

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