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Saturday, August 9, 2014

Outside Atlanta Hospital, Liberians Praise American Ebola Patients

Outside Atlanta Hospital, Liberians Praise American Ebola Patients


Outside Atlanta Hospital, Liberians Praise American Ebola Patients

Posted: 09 Aug 2014 11:04 AM PDT

There are about a dozen yelling and cheering men and women carrying signs in front of Emory University Hospital here in Atlanta Saturday afternoon. On first look, they appear to be demonstrators protesting the hospital’s decision to accept for treatment a pair of Americans who contracted Ebola while working in West Africa. But a closer look reveals the group is actually a rally meant as a thank you to those patients, a physician and an aid worker who contracted the disease on a missionary trip to Liberia.

It’s 77 degrees and nearly 80% humidity here Saturday afternoon, but members of the Liberian Association of Metropolitan Atlanta (LAMA), a nonprofit representing Liberian citizens residing in Atlanta, are out in force, singing the praises of Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, who are currently in isolation and being treated by the hospital’s infectious disease experts.

“We heard about Dr. Kent Brantly and missionary Nancy Writebol and how they risked their lives to serve humanity and also us,” says Leo Mulbah, president of LAMA. “On behalf of a very grateful nation and community, we came to say thank you to them. We don't have money to give them. We don't have anything to give them, but we can say thank you. Thanks to them, [Liberians] are getting the attention our downtrodden folks need, and for that, we tell their families we are in solidarity with them.”

The LAMA members outside the hospital are singing praises to God and holding up signs that read: “Nancy Writebol you’re our hero!” and “We are with ya’ll in prayers.” The group has been holding frequent town hall meetings for their roughly 15,000 members to raise money to buy equipment that might help stop the spread of Ebola in Liberia, where it’s killed nearly 280 people and triggered a nationwide state of emergency.

The two Americans being treated at Emory have been given an experimental drug to fight the disease, a decision that’s caused controversy as there’s not enough of the drug for it to be widely deployed. When asked about the disagreements over the drug, Mulbah said his group is entirely disinterested in the politics surrounding the debate. For now, he says, LAMA and its members just want to offer thanks on behalf of Liberia.

“They epitomize what you need from a human being,” said Mulbah. “We are very thankful that their families allowed them to share their talents to the point of death for us.”

Argentine Musician Finds Out His Biological Parents Were Killed by Country’s Dictatorship 36 Years Ago

Posted: 09 Aug 2014 09:39 AM PDT

It wasn’t until his thirty-sixth birthday two months ago that Ignacio Hurban was told he was adopted. But his was no regular adoption — it transpired instead under the most violent of circumstances.

His real parents, Oscar Montoya and Laura Carlotto, were arrested in November 1977 by Argentina’s ruling dictatorship because of their political activities, disappearing into the macabre system of death camps the military set up across Argentina. His father was secretly executed shortly after his arrest. But his mother, two months pregnant, was kept alive until Hurban was born in June 1978, after which she was also murdered.

Hurban’s case was by no means an isolated one. It’s estimated that some 500 infants suffered the same fate during the bloody 1976-83 Argentinian regime, during which some 20,000 mostly young left-wing political activists were murdered. The military made only one exception during its killing spree: Pregnant women were kept alive until they gave birth. Afterwards, the infants were handed over to military families or unsuspecting couples to be raised according to the “Western and Christian” values the military claimed to defend. These infants grew up completely unaware of their real identities.

“It’s a crime beyond all imagination,” says Robert Cox, a British journalist who lived in Argentina during those years, bravely reporting and even confronting top generals personally about the crimes they were committing. “I still don’t understand how men who are meant to be men of honor, military men, could fall so low. It’s the one crime above all others that wakes us up to the horror of what happened and how terribly evil it was.”

Two former dictators of that regime were eventually convicted for the systematic kidnapping of children. Jorge Rafael Videla died in prison last year while serving a 50-year sentence, Reynaldo Bignone remains behind bars. Various military couples who knowingly took in such children have also been convicted, including cases in which the “adoptive father” played a hand in the killing of the infants’ real parents.

After Laura Carlotto disappeared in 1977, her mother, Estela Carlotto, now 83, moved heaven and earth looking for the grandson she heard from death camp survivors had been born in captivity. In her search, Carlotto started meeting mothers whose pregnant daughters had also “disappeared” at the hands of the military. With them she founded the Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo association, a group that has dedicated decades of work to its painful search.

Carlotto’s untiring quest turned her into a major public figure in Argentina. That brought her a notoriety tinged with the sadness, as even though the Grandmothers located 113 grandchildren of murdered parents, she had not been able in all that time to find her own grandson. Last week, then, when it was announced that the 114th grandchild to be “recovered” was Carlotto’s, practically all of Argentina exploded with joy. The story has dominated the country’s public attention ever since.

“I didn’t want to die without hugging him,” Carlotto told the press, practically in tears, last Tuesday after she got a call from the judge handling the case confirming the DNA match.

But in the end it was actually Hurban who found his grandmother. Until last week, Carlotto’s lost grandson had lived under the name Ignacio Hurban, the son of Clemente and Juana María Hurban, two retired farm workers in Olavarría, a small town in Buenos Aires province. Over the years, Hurban and his wife had raised a family of their own, with two small children. He became a music teacher and an accomplished fusion musician, mixing classical, jazz and Argentine folklore musical styles, and has played with some of Argentina’s leading recording stars:

Hurban, who according to Argentine human rights law must now change his legal name to the one his mother reportedly wished for him at birth — Guido Montoya Carlotto — first started having doubts about his identity four years ago.

“There’s a noise in your head, doubts like butterflies outside your field of vision, there are things you don’t know, but you know, and then you start asking yourself questions,” he said Friday at a press conference in Buenos Aires.

When he was told two months ago for the first time that he was adopted, he decided to approach the DNA bank the Grandmothers have set up with samples of their blood, to see if he might be the son of a “disappeared” couple.

“Among the pieces that didn’t fit was my fondness for music,” said Hurban, commenting on the striking resemblance he now sees between himself and the pictures of his father he’s seen since his identity was confirmed by the DNA match. He said he was “shocked” to discover that his blood father, Oscar Montoya, was also a musician, and played in a group called “Nosotros y Ustedes” (Us and You) in his youth.

“I’ve found an answer to a question I get asked a lot: Why are you a musician?,” Hurban said.

The road ahead for Hurban — or Montoya Carlotto if he changes his surname — is not an easy one, says Victoria Donda, the 78th recovered grandchild, who today is a legislator in Argentina’s Congress. “It’s very difficult to process where you were born, how you were orphaned, to rebuild as an adult an entire biological family that you had never met, a different birthday, a different name,” she said in a press interview.

“I’m used to my name Ignacio and I’m going to keep it,” Hurban said at his press conference. “I also understand that there is a family who have called me Guido for 30 years. But I feel comfortable with what I’ve been given. I feel happy and grateful.”

When photographers at the press conference called him “Guido” to pose for a shot, he joked: “Come on, call me Ignacio.”

Still, a shadow still remains over the details of Hurban’s childhood. Carlotto has said that his adoptive parents were probably not aware he was the baby of a “disappeared” couple when they took charge of him. A court case has been opened to investigate the details of that adoption process. Urban described his adoptive parents as an “extraordinary couple” who raised him “with the greatest love.”

The happy ending to Carlotto’s long odyssey, meanwhile, has Argentina ecstatic. “There’s enormous euphoria now,” says Cox. “It seems a very wonderful ending, though it actually is a beginning really, it gives people a lot of hope for the remaining hundreds of still-unfound grandchildren.”

“This restitution is also a symbol,” said Hurban. “It’s a small victory within a big defeat.”

Kim Kardashian Is Publishing A 352-Page Book of Her Own Selfies

Posted: 09 Aug 2014 09:39 AM PDT

In what may be our epoch’s most brilliant statement ever on millennial culture, Kim Kardashian is working on a book that will consist purely of her selfies. “Selfish,” to be published by Rizzoli’s Universe imprint, will feature “many never-before-seen personal images,” according to the book’s description, and appears to not be a parody.

Besides being a full-throated celebration of narcissism at its sultriest and most duck-lipped, it could, theoretically, be a moneymaker. Or a work of art that defines our times, apparently:

“Widely regarded as a trailblazer of the "selfie movement"—a modern-day self-portrait of the digital age—Kim has mastered the art of taking flattering and highly personal photos of oneself,” says Rizzoli in its description of the book.

The $20 book will be 352 pages long and feature close-ups of the starlet’s pouting face on page after page, until each of those pages are filled.

Her photos are sure to run the gamut from sexually suggestive to sexually suggestive, much like her Instagram. If you can’t get enough of Kim’s coy, sidelong glance and her curiously vacant eyes, this book’s for your coffee table.

5 Things I Learned When I Quit Facebook

Posted: 09 Aug 2014 09:00 AM PDT

I have a Facebook problem.

The problem is, I love Facebook. I love posting about my day, connecting with friends near and far, and seeing the funny/crazy/sweet things people share. But I also hate Facebook, for being such a time suck, for making me feel bad about myself when other people's lives seem so much more exciting than mine, and for leading me to spend more time interacting with a screen than with the real world. And when I log off Facebook, Instagram and Twitter are there clamoring for my attention, a never-ending scroll of links and tweets and photos and conversations that feels impossible to keep up with.

A few weeks ago, I'd had it. It seemed like social media was bringing me more guilt and frustration than happiness. So I decided to go on a fast, starting immediately. Here's what I've learned:

Cold turkey was the way to go

I've made attempts to cut down before, setting rules like "Only check Facebook first thing in the morning" or "Only check Twitter during lunch" or, when I came back to work after maternity leave, "Only use social media while pumping breast milk." But one quick check in the morning always turned into needing to get back on at 11am to see if anyone commented on that one post, which turned into composing witty replies to those comments, which turned into OMG I'm late for that meeting! I had no self-control. Cutting myself off from social media completely was the only way to ensure I'd stay honest. I even deleted the Facebook app from my phone.

The FOMO wasn't as bad as I'd feared

Yes, I missed a bunch of birthdays, and yes, I would have missed the news of a former coworker's engagement if another friend hadn't seen the post and clued me in. But to my surprise, even from day 1 of my fast, I didn't feel like I was truly missing out on anything. My best friend from high school texted me cute pictures of her 2-year-old. I caught up with people over email or even on the phone (remember that?). I checked my favorite news sites for the day's headlines. I was good.

What I wasn't getting: constant updates about the awesome vacations people were taking (making me feel like a boring homebody), or the amazing educational activities they'd planned for their kids (making me feel like a slacker mom), or the IMPORTANT POLITICAL THING WE SHOULD ALL TAKE ACTION ON NOW that inevitably devolved into a nasty name-calling flame war (making me feel tired). I didn't miss any of that at all.

Facebook, on the other hand, seemed to think I was missing out big-time. Since day 3 of no Facebook, I've been getting increasingly desperate daily emails like this one:

I was way more productive

I had never realized how often during the workday I clicked on Facebook out of sheer habit—I caught myself typing in the URL on autopilot way too many times that first Facebook-free day. But the real shocker was how much more I got done at home, when my evenings no longer disappeared into a black hole of sitting on the couch scrolling through my feeds. I read actual books! I made a quilt! I worked out! It was almost embarrassing how much time I suddenly had on my hands.

I was more present

When I wasn't constantly thinking about how to describe every moment in a perfect tweet or status update, I got to actually live the moment. I took pictures of my kids just for me, rather than for a filtered-and-framed Instagram shot. When we went to the beach or had dinner with friends, I savored the experience for itself, not for how good it would make me look when I posted about it.

I might be cured of my Facebook addiction

I stayed on total social media blackout for two full weeks. Then I decided to let myself hop back on Instagram once, to post a photo of the Lightning McQueen cake I made for my son's birthday. A few days later, I started sending out a few tweets. But Facebook…oh, Facebook, you ultimate time-suck. I was really worried that I would get back on Facebook and immediately fall back into my old ways. Was it even possible for me to use Facebook in a healthy way?

Last night I got on Facebook, for the first time in more than three weeks. I scrolled through my feed for about five minutes. And then…I closed my browser. I put away my laptop. And I went to bed. And I don't really feel like going back.

It turns out my Facebook addiction was just a (really) bad habit. By interrupting the habit, I might have broken the cycle. I won't quit Facebook completely—all those things I love about it haven't changed. But now that I know I can go without it entirely, it seems easy to limit myself to just checking in, say, twice a week. Wish me luck!

 

More from Health.com

7 Ways Social Media Messes with Your Mind

I’m a Facebook Addict: Is This Healthy?

Powering Down: How to Reduce Digital Distractions

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

Jeannie Kim is the Executive Deputy Editor at Health.

Malala and Sheryl Sandberg Talk Girls’ Education

Posted: 09 Aug 2014 08:40 AM PDT

Sheryl Sandberg hosted a Facebook livestream event Friday with Malala Yousafzai, who answered questions from all over the world about her work to promote education for the 60 million girls worldwide who don’t go to school.

Malala, who became an international human rights leader after she was shot in the head by the Taliban on her way to school in Pakistan in 2012, took questions from Facebook users about terrorism, education and her goals for the future.

When asked how she would change the minds of anti-education terrorist groups like Boko Haram, Malala said, “the first thing is that we should ask ourselves: why do the terrorists become terrorists?” She noted that most terrorist groups are created from poverty and discrimination, but that education can help alleviate both of these causes. “This is why I fight for education, because through education we can fight terrorism, not through guns and not through weapons."

Malala stayed remarkably on-message during the interview, answering almost every question with an impassioned argument for more girls education or a gracious thank you to her father and mother for supporting her. But there were a few moments where it became clear that, at home, she’s still just a regular 17-year old girl:

"Sometimes my brothers think I'm my parents’ favorite, but I think it’s fine. I think that kind of discrimination is okay.

And then later:

"I have two brothers and they really make me behave like a child… I tell my parents, these boys are fighting with me, and you’re discriminating!"

Teenagers, take note: accusing your parents of discrimination is the best way to win fights with your annoying brothers.

 

Judge in Collusion Case: Silicon Valley Was Afraid of Steve Jobs

Posted: 09 Aug 2014 07:59 AM PDT

Silicon Valley feared late Apple CEO Steve Jobs before his death in 2011, a judge in a collusion lawsuit brought against Apple and three other top tech companies said Friday.

The suit was brought on behalf of 64,000 tech workers against Apple, Google, Intel, and Adobe for allegedly agreeing not to poach each other’s employees, a precedent that some say was set after Jobs reached a no-poaching deal for Pixar.

That deal become the model for all the tech companies, said Judge Lucy Koh. Silicon Valley companies’ "fear of and deference to" Jobs was a large reason for the willingness of other tech companies to join in the alleged conspiracy in which major players are said to have agreed not to hire each others’ employees, the Financial Times reports.

"There is compelling evidence that Steve Jobs … was a, if not the, central figure in the alleged conspiracy," Judge Lucy Koh wrote as she rejected a proposed $324.5m settlement in the case.

Google co-founder Sergey Brin was more succinct. He was quoted as saying, “I think Mr. Jobs' view was that people shouldn't piss him off. And I think that things that pissed him off were – would be hiring, you know – whatever.”

[FT]

Live: Obama Speaks About Iraq

Posted: 09 Aug 2014 07:19 AM PDT

President Barack Obama is set to deliver a statement on Iraq from the White House at 10:25 a.m. ET Saturday. Watch live here.

Fasting Can Cause Weight Gain and Poor Sleep

Posted: 09 Aug 2014 07:00 AM PDT

Given my 15-plus years in private practice I don't believe there's a one-size-fits-all approach to nutrition and weight loss. What works for one person may not work—or feel good—for another. That's why I believe it's so critical to listen to your body to determine what feels best and is sustainable for you, despite how popular an approach may be— from juice cleanses and detoxes to "caveman" versus vegan diets.

Regarding one strategy that's currently trending, intermittent fasting, I've seen very mixed results. Many men, particularly those who struggle with excess weight and conditions like diabetes or metabolic syndrome, have reported positive results with this semi-fasting approach. But for many women I've counseled, any type of fasting—whether it be overnight for 16 hours every night, or capping calories at 500 two days a week—has seriously backfired. If you're thinking of giving it a try, here are four potential unwanted effects to consider.

Rebound overeating

Limiting food intake to just eight hours each day or severely restricting calories a few days a week are two popular fasting approaches. I've seen both lead to intense cravings, preoccupation with food, and rebound binge eating, particularly for women. Some who attempted to cut off eating after 4pm (with the intention of eating again at 8am) have told me that after hours of lingering thoughts about food, or watching other family members eat, they just couldn't take it anymore, and wound up raiding the kitchen and eating far more than they would have on a typical night. Others, who attempt to eat no more than 500 calories a day two non-consecutive days each week, often begin daydreaming on fasting days about what they can eat on nonfasting days, and end up eating decadent goodies more often, like baked goods, pizza, chips, and ice cream. The lesson: even if this tactic has worked miracles for a friend, co-worker, or family member, if it leaves you in a food frenzy, it's not the best approach for you.

Poor sleep

I've tried intermittent fasting myself, and like clients and others I've talked to, it interfered with my ability to fall asleep and stay asleep. This effect can not only wreak havoc with daytime energy, but a plethora of studies have shown that sleep length and quality are strongly associated with weight control. Too little sleep has been shown to increase hunger, up cravings for sweet and fatty foods, reduce the desire to eat healthy foods like veggies, and trigger excessive eating overall and weight gain. For these reasons, I don't believe that fasting is an optimal strategy for many people. In fact, some clients have told me they got out of bed at 3am after waking up, and you guessed it, wound up either eating, drinking alcohol, or both, in order to fall asleep—not a good recipe for weight loss or wellness.

Fewer nutrients

As a nutritionist, one of my biggest pet peeves with fasting is that I've seen it compromise overall nutrition by limiting the intake of veggies, fruit, even lean protein and healthy fats, which are strongly tied to keeping metabolism revved, boosting satiety, and reducing inflammation—all critical for weight control. I think this is especially the case when people become focused on calorie counts rather than food quality. If you do decide to try intermittent fasting, or even a modified version, make every morsel count by sticking with naturally nutrient rich whole and fresh foods rather than processed "diet" products.

Muscle loss

Unfortunately, fasting doesn't trigger your body to break down only your fat reserves. While that would make weight loss so much easier, metabolism is a bit more complex. Your body burns a combination of fat and carbohydrate and after about six hours or so, when carbohydrates aren't being consumed and your body's "back up" stores in your liver have been depleted, you begin to convert some lean tissue into carbohydrate. The ratio of how much fat to muscle you lose may vary depending on your body composition, protein intake, and activity level, but again, this is where I've seen women and men experience different results. Research shows that in postmenopausal women, a higher protein intake is needed in order to lose less muscle mass (not offset the effect completely), but many women tell me that when they fast they crave carbs, which may lead to a loss of muscle while maintaining body fat—the opposite of their intended goal. Bottom line: again, think through what feels good and in sync with your body's needs, and remember, sustainability is key.

More from Health.com

11 Foods That Make You Hungrier

14 Fad Diets You Shouldn’t Try

10 Bogus Health Trends That Waste Your Time

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, sports nutrition consultant to the NHL’s New York Rangers and the MLB’s Tampa Bay Rays.

Amazon Publishes Hachette CEO’s Email in Latest Salvo Over E-Book Pricing

Posted: 09 Aug 2014 06:39 AM PDT

Updated at 2:05 p.m.

In its latest move in an escalating battle over e-book pricing, Amazon attacked book publisher Hachette in a strongly-worded letter Saturday which includes the Hachette CEO’s email address and encourages authors to contact him directly.

Amazon and Hachette have been locked in a duel over the pricing of e-books. Amazon argues their price should be lower, while Hachette’s holding out for higher prices. Hachette’s camp has also accused Amazon of making it more difficult for customers to find and buy books from publishers with which Amazon is negotiating new terms.

In its letter, the Seattle-based online retailer reiterated its case for lower e-book pricing, saying that because of the absence of shipping, handling and printing costs, “e-books can and should be less expensive.” On top of that, Amazon has argued that e-books are just 1% of the revenue of Hachette’s parent company, and that the company could agree to Amazon’s demands with little financial impact.

In its letter, Amazon compared e-books to the advent of paperback books, which it said aroused resistance from authors like George Orwell who ostensibly argued paperback books would ruin the industry. “Fast forward to today, and it’s the e-book’s turn to be opposed by the literary establishment,” Amazon says in its letter.

(In fact, George Orwell was not opposed to paperback books, and Amazon’s letter quotes the 1984 author misleadingly, as the New York Times reports. Orwell also was ambivalent about lowering book prices, calling cheaper books a “disaster” for authors and publishers.)

Amazon’s note also urges authors to email Hatchette CEO Michael Pietsch with specific talking points and publicly disclosed Pietsch’s email address.

“We will never give up our fight for reasonable e-book prices,” reads Amazon’s letter. “We know making books more affordable is good for book culture. We’d like your help. Please email Hachette and copy us.”

One author who received the letter and has published e-books through Amazon spoke out against the company’s tactics.

“It’s overtly divisive, pitting authors against one another,” San Francisco-resident Ron Martinez told the Wall Street Journal of Amazon’s latest salvo. Martinez is the CEO of an e-book discoverability service. “It’s astonishingly poor form to publish an executive’s email.”

Amazon’s letter comes just after over nine hundred authors signed a separate message to Amazon calling on the company to stop blocking the sale of Hachette books. Literary icons Malcolm Gladwell, Stephen King, Douglas Preston, Robert A. Caro, Junot Díaz, Malcolm Gladwell, Lemony Snicket (the pen name of Daniel Handler), Michael Chabon, Michael Lewis, and Jon Krakauer are just a smattering of the names who signed that note, the New York Times reports.

The authors’ letter, which also publicly discloses Jeff Bezos’ email address, is set to run as a full-page ad in the Times this weekend.

Rockets, Airstrikes After Gaza Truce Collapses

Posted: 09 Aug 2014 06:21 AM PDT

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Israeli airstrikes struck more than 20 targets Saturday in the Gaza Strip and killed a senior Hamas member, as militant rocket fire continued following the collapse of a three-day truce aimed at ending the war between Israel and Hamas.

Hamas officials said Israel airstrikes hit houses, mosques, its warehouses and training sites. Three bodies were found under the ruins of the al-Qassam mosque in Gaza, including that of senior Hamas official Moaaz Zaid, said Palestinian health official Ashraf al-Kidra.

The Israeli military said militants in Gaza fired five rockets Saturday toward Israel, for a total of 70 since the truce expired. In response, Israel has targeted more than 30 sites in Gaza since Friday, it said.

The Islamic militants resumed their rocket attacks Friday shortly before the 72-hour truce expired, injuring two Israelis and drawing a wave of retaliatory airstrikes. The fighting shattered a brief calm in the monthlong war and dealt a blow to Egyptian-led efforts to secure a long-term cease-fire between the bitter enemies.

More than 1,900 Gazans have been killed in the war, roughly three-quarters of them civilians, according to Palestinian and United Nations officials. Israel disputes that breakdown, saying more militants have been killed. Sixty-seven people have been killed on the Israeli side, including three civilians from rocket fire.

The war grew out of the killing of three Israeli teens in the West Bank in June. Israel blamed the killings on Hamas and launched a massive arrest campaign, rounding up hundreds of its members in the West Bank, as Hamas and other militants unleashed rocket fire from Gaza.

On July 8, Israel launched an air campaign on the coastal territory, sending in ground troops nine days later to target rocket launchers and cross-border tunnels built by Hamas for attacks inside Israel. Gaza militants have fired more than 3,000 rockets into Israel.

Hamas, which violently seized control of Gaza in 2007, rejected several cease-fire offers throughout the fighting. Its primary demand is the lifting of an Israeli-Egyptian blockade imposed after they seized power. Militants had warned they would resume fighting after the cease-fire expired unless there was a deal to ease the restrictions.

The blockade, which Israel says is needed to prevent weapons from reaching Gaza, has led to widespread hardship. Movement in and out of Gaza is limited, and the economy has ground to a standstill and unemployment is over 50 percent.

Israel has said that the militants must disarm first, a demand dismissed by Hamas.

Hamas entered the Cairo talks from a position of military weakness, as Israel has said Hamas has lost hundreds of fighters, two-thirds of its rocket arsenal and all of its tunnels under the border with Israel during the war. Egypt also has destroyed a network of smuggling tunnels that was once Hamas’ economic and military lifeline.

A delegation of Palestinian negotiators remained in Cairo in hopes of salvaging the talks. But participants said the negotiations were not going well. The Palestinian delegation met again late Friday with Egyptian mediators.

Azzam al-Ahmad, head of the Palestinian delegation, said the delegation would stay in Egypt until it reaches an agreement that “ensures” the rights of the Palestinian people. “We told Egyptians we are staying,” he told reporters.

The Israeli delegation to the Cairo talks left Egypt on Friday morning, and it was not clear if it would return. “There will not be negotiations under fire,” Israeli government spokesman Mark Regev said.

Egypt’s Foreign Ministry urged restraint by both sides and called for a new cease-fire to resume negotiations. The ministry said progress had been made in the talks but did not explain.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon expressed “deep disappointment” at the failure to extend the cease-fire and urged the parties to swiftly find a way back to the negotiating table, U.N. deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said.

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